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Yoshifanatic's ASM Showoff: Part 11 (Day 4)
Forum Index - Sunken Ghost Ship - C3 Museum - Winter 2021 - Yoshifanatic's ASM Showoff: Part 11 (Day 4)
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Happy C3 guys! :)

So, what's ol' Yoshifanatic got in store for C3 this time around? Utter insanity! You see, I got this thought in my head about a month after the previous C3. That thought was, "did I leave the oven on?". I then had another thought, and that was "How many disassemblies could I make before next C3?" That's the sort of thought a normal person would not have, but I'm not a normal person. I'm an absolute madman! A madman that loves the SNES and wanted to gain a better appreciation for it by disassembling games I've had since I was a kid (with 2 exceptions).

So, join me on a 4 day journey of fascinating SNES related trivia, stuff that could become future innovations in the SMW hacking scene, and bits and pieces of my own personal experiences with each game.

For easy reference, here are the links to each day's post:
Day 1
Day 2
Day 3
Day 4

Note: All of these disassemblies will require a clean, headerless ROM of a fully supported version to assemble. This ROM will be used to extract assets for the disassembly to use. This makes it safer to host/distribute the disassemblies by removing as many copyrightable assets as possible.

To verify that you have the correct ROM, get its MD5 hash with whatever program you like and compare the hash with the one in the ROM Map file for that ROM version. If the ROM is headered, use a hex editor like HxD to remove the first $0200 bytes, then set the extention to .sfc so asar recognizes it as a headerless ROM.

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Yoshi's Island Disassembly
Github Link



Whoashi! It's the original Yoshi exploshi!

Supported ROMs (1)
- USA

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Plok! Disassembly
Github Link



The cult classic game that may make you shout about toothpaste in frustration!

Supported ROMs (5 total)
- USA
- PAL
- Japan
- (Incomplete) German
- (Incomplete) French

Also, if you're a fan of this game or the character, consider following the Pickford Bros. on Youtube, Twitter, or Discord

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Earthworm Jim 2 Disassembly
Github Link



What color is Yoshifanatic's green Yoshi avatar?

A: Red
B: Yellow
Y: It's purple, duh!

Supported ROMs (1)
- USA

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Bonus: Azentiger LPs and rates SMW Hacks LP list

Bonus: Super Mario World Custom 2 (aka Mario's Strange Quest V1.0)

I've come a long way in the past 10 years since joining SMWCentral. Let's celebrate by taking a look back at the hack I posted the day I joined SMWCentral to see how far I've come.
Plus, allow me to bring attention to the Youtuber who played a small, but incredibly important role in getting me where I am today (and who is also one of my favorite LPers, not just for this reason).

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Yoshi's Island: The only game to make carrying babies on the backs of colorful dinosaurs through colorful environments cool!

Anyway, here is the technical stuff:
- This game makes heavy usage of the SuperFX chip. It isn't just graphical stuff either.

- Despite what the YI ROM map implies or Raidenthequick's disassembly (which I occasionally checked to help me with some of the more confusing stuff this game does), the ROM is technically not laid out like $00-$3F. It's actually $00-$17, $4C-$5F. YI makes use of the HiROM mirror for everything past bank 17, so it's a bit misleading to refer to that area as $18-$3F.

- As of right now, there is a bug with asar that prevents this disassembly from assembling 100% perfectly due to how I handled the SuperFX code (In order to get around asar limitations, I'm assembling all the SuperFX code separately, to be able to provide a method to link the SuperFX code/data on the SNES side during the main SNES code assembly). I did verify that all the SuperFX code is correct however. Raidenthequick's disassembly doesn't attempt to adjust pointers based on what the user adds/removes, hence why his disassembly doesn't have this issue.

- There isn't much else I can talk about, as this disassembly took me so long to do, I wanted to move on with another game. I didn't bother to look super deep into a lot of things.



Regarding my personal experiences:
- Would it surprise you if I told you that this is one of my all-time favorite games? That's the whole reason I disassembled it myself despite the existence of another disassembly. I wanted to be able to say I disassembled my favorite game.

- It's ironic that one of my favorite games was also my least favorite game to disassemble. It wasn't even because of the SuperFX stuff (though it didn't help) but more because of the sheer amount of code that needed to be cleaned up.

- I remember Naval Piranha gave me a lot of trouble as a kid, since my reading skills were weak and those 3 messages boxes explain how your eggs skid on water were lost on me. Also, I did not know about the Easter egg, though I did eventually discover it on my own.

- Sluggy the Unshaven also gave me trouble, to the point where I needed my cousin's help to beat it.

- I have the V1.1 version of Yoshi's Island. How can I tell? Because there is a bug in this version where, after beating a level, if you hold L/R on the map screen and press the D-pad, the previous level's Yoshi will change color. This doesn't happen in V1.0.


- The monkeys in this game were fun to mess around with. It amused me how they were made of iron and they would shrug off damage unless you swallow them or walk into them when they're down. This often led to me doing ridiculous things with them, like pretending to give one a bath in a ? bucket, but I can't because it keeps bonking onto the handle.

- Aside from the monkeys, quite a few other enemies were fun to mess around with. The way enemies interact with Yoshi, his projectiles, or other enemies is something that gives this game so much of its charm for me.

- "Bad monkeys play with bombs!" is one of my inside jokes. I'd usually say this whenever I came across a monkey holding a bomb and usually I'd grab it while it's holding the bomb.

- Most people find Baby Mario's cry annoying. Being the strange kid I was, not only didn't it bother me, but I thought it was odd when the GBA version toned it down (though to be fair, I also found some of the other sound changes in that version odd).

- Would it surprise you for me to say I found the fuzzies hilarious? One particular element of it that I funny was that if Yoshi eats one, not only does it looks like he lets out a big fart, but said "fart" is able to hurt enemies.

-----------------------------------------------

*Pulls out harmonica* .... *stares at it with confused look* What? Did you expect me to play it?

Regarding Plok, I never actually had this game growing up. In fact, I never played it at all until I aquired a ROM for it in order to work on this disassembly. So why did I disassemble it? Because I was told the developers lost the source code and they wanted someone to disassemble the game. Since I had the skills to do it, I figured "why not?". However, I get the impression nowadays that it was the fans who wanted a disassembly, but the devs were fine if someone disassemblied the game. Either way, that's how this came about.
Because of the way the game is coded, it only took me a week to disassemble the USA version. Incidentally, the speed at which I was able to do this is what inspired me to do more disassemblies, although in secret. Some of these disassemblies took a similar amount of time, although a few took longer.

As for the game itself, there are a lot of interesting things about Plok on the technical level:
- From a coding standpoint, this is a game that heavily prioritizes speed over space while SMW is the opposite. This can be seen in how:
+ FastROM addressing is used by default
+ Levels are stored as compressed, raw tilemaps, wheras SMW has an object system to generate the level data.
+ Player graphics and animated level tiles are stored uncompressed in the ROM.
+ 16x16 tile mode is heavily used, which simplifies the scrolling tilemap updating routine and also removes the need for "map16".
+ The 16x16/32x32 sprite tile mode is used, saving time on sprite drawing, which is good because this game's sprites are bigger on average than SMW's.
+ 16-bit A/X/Y is frequently used, even in cases where it would mean wasted ROM space.
All of these and more add up to a game that rarely, if ever, slows down.


- This game's non-SPC700 code only spans across 3 banks, making it comparable to SMAS SMB1 in that regard.

- I used to think that the 16x16 tile mode was a useless, gimmicky feature of the SNES ... until I saw how this game made use of it. What you sacrifice in tile variety, you make up with faster tilemap uploads, allowing for effects like these with much less risk of running out of V-Blank time:



This is possible because the 16x16 tile mode allows you to update 4 8x8 tiles in the amount of time it'd take to update 1 in the 8x8 tile mode.

- This game's soundtrack was composed by the Follin Bros., which should tell you everything you need to know about it. Ie. It's some of the best music on the SNES. Three particular highlights are the Main Theme,Beach Theme, and Boss Theme.

- The laugh sample in the boss theme is actually not unique to this game. It's also used as a sound effect for the clown enemies in Spiderman & the X-Men in Arcade's Revenge.

- This game packs a surprising amount of variety into what little code it uses. There are a whole bunch of different vehicles and powerup costumes Plok can use.

As for my personal experience with this game:
- As stated before, I never had this game growing up. However, I did have a game from the same developer which, funnily enough, has a few things in common with Plok (ex. Excellent music, no save feature, frustrating), except this other game is much worse than Plok. What game am I talking about? Spiderman & the X-Men in Arcade's Revenge.

- When playing it for the first time, I got a game over on level 3. Most of the bosses also gave me trouble, but I've gotten better at some of them to the point where I can almost do them without taking damage.

- This game has quite a bit of personality to it, and was something I found pretty charming.

- I found the final world to be the most boring part of the game, mainly because all these levels have the same music, same graphics, and same palette. The fact that each level played differently didn't stop this part from wearing out its welcome to me. However, the rest of the game was overall good.

- That quip I wrote below the disassembly's download link seems oddly specific, doesn't it? Well, I found out that one of the end level quotes in the German version has
Grandpappy Plok
angerly shouting "Dent-A-Plok makes teeth whiter.", which makes just as much sense out of context as it does in context.

- If this game is ever made available on somewhere like Steam, I'll certainly buy a copy, even though I essentially had to find this game for free to be able to disassemble it.

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*A loud mooing as heard as a cow launches through the air*

What the? I saw a cow flying through the air? That must mean the next game I'll be talking about is an Earthworm Jim game! Specifically 2, since that's the one I grew up with.

Here are some interesting technical stuff about this game:
- Over 1/3 of the 3 MB ROM is taken up by uncompressed sprite graphics. This game has some of the most fluid animations you'll see in any SNES game, so it shouldn't shock you that that much of the ROM is used up on just uncompressed graphics alone. I mean, look at this:



- Ever wonder how this game has such a wide variety of sound effects of decent sound quality without compromising the quality of the music? Three words: HDMA Sample Streaming. HDMA is capable of writing to $2140-$2143, so with the right setup, it's possible to send data to the SPC700 with it while largely freeing up the main CPU to do other things. I didn't look super deep into it, but here are some things I did notice about the implementation:
+ The data being streamed is buffered into the RAM.
+ HDMA channel 0 is used. Incidentally, this is the only game I looked at where this channel was used for HDMA. This was done presumably to ensure that the sample streaming isn't interrupted by other HDMA channels, as 0 is the highest priority channel and therefore goes first.
+ An IRQ is used in order to sync up the main CPU and SPC700 at a specific point during the frame. This is to ensure the sample streaming is not influenced by lag and to set up the SPC700 to be in sample streaming mode.
+ Only one streamable sound can be streamed at a time.
+ Some sounds, like the whip crack, are not streamed.

- The above is why the audio is broken when playing this game in ZSNES. This setup requires some fairly strict timing to pull off, and ZSNES's timing is off enough that it results in streamed samples often failing to play.

- There is an unused gun in the game data, which is basically just a duplicate of the homing missile. What's interesting is that the index of this gun is in between two used indexes and the game explicitly skips past its index when switching weapons.

- This game has a system where streamed sounds can specify their pitch when being sent over, which allowed sounds to be reused in surprising ways. For example, did you know that the sound of the pig's oinking and the sound of Jim eating Bob the Killer Goldfish was the same sound, except the latter is higher pitched?

- This game seems to make heavy usage of some sort of scripting language. I didn't have the time to figure it out, but this scripting is what allows this game to have as many set pieces as it does as well as its varied gameplay.

- Jim's HP caps off at 200%, but the game supports his HP being as high as 9999%. However, if you set it higher than 999%, the thousands digit won't display.

- For whatever reason, various counters in the RAM, such as Jim's current HP, are stored in ASCII. This means that, for example, if Jim's ammo count for his current weapon is 200, it's stored as "32 30 30".

- The game achieves the death screen by greying out every palette except Jim's and removing every sprite except Jim from the screen. This is how it's able to appear so quickly. Here is a screenshot showing what I mean, after dying in one of the Puppy Love levels:


- The title screen, title card screen, and the cow screen all use mode 3 to display an 8BPP image.

- For some reason, the SPC700 engine is divided up into 252 byte packets. Because that would be annoying to work with, I made it so that the engine code is not split up like that and used a macro to split the SPC engine as it's inserted during assembly. I can't think of much reason why the engine was split like this other than it being some crude attempt to make it harder to reverse engineer.

- This game was likely written in a higher level language given how the code is structured. Which makes sense, as this was a multi-platform game.

- Take a closer look at the buildings in the Puppy Love stage. This game has a really convincing looking 3D perspective on the sides of these buildings, which is accomplished using windowing and a couple sprites.

- Do I even need to mention this game has a great soundtrack?

As for my personal experiences with this game:
- I've had this game since I was a kid, but I didn't get to play the first game until 2013 when I played the Steam version. I eventually got myself the SNES version several years later.

- This game's quirky nature was one of the bigger influences when making my SMW hacks, particularly for YSQ's manual as I had the Earthworm Jim 2 manual growing up.

- In my opinion, this game has one of the best sets of sound effects for any video game. They perfectly capture this game's quirky nature.

- I always liked blasting away all the dirt in Lorenzen's Soil. Not sure why, seeing as how people often tend to find that level a bit tedious.

- Also, in Lorenzen's Soil, I'll sometimes let the timer run out on purpose and have Jim pull out the manta shield at the last minute in a futile attempt to protect him from the "meatball shower" (that's what I call the big dirt balls that fall when the timer runs out, since that's what they look like to me).

- I'll sometimes have Jim hang out with a cow in one of the giant bathtubs in Udderly Abducted in a futile attempt to hide the cow from the UFOs. It obviously doesn't work, but it's kind of silly how the UFOs just know where the cow is.

- In a similar vein as above, I'll sometimes purposefully let one of the cow bombs explode while having Jim hide in the bathtub.

- During the Flamin' Yawn boss fight, if you're playing on normal or difficult, Jim will sink into the pizza like quicksand and if he sinks deep enough, he dies instantly. The sheer absurdity of this always gets a laugh out of me, especially after I found out that not even being in map view mode protects you from the pizza's deadly properties.

- When I was testing out the fact that Jim's true max HP is 9999%, I did so by having leaving him idle next to Psy-crow's house in the Puppy Love stages and letting him become a chew toy for Peter Puppy.

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Regarding the list of Azentiger LPs and the fact that I linked to the first version of MSQ, did you guys know it's been a decade since I first joined SMWCentral and the day I first posted the first version of what would become Mario's Strange Quest? December 24, 2010 was the 10 year anniversary date. To celebrate, I figured I'd show you guys part of my early history online so you can see how far I've come. Today, I'm likely known for my crazy ASM skills and for creating what people consider as one of the best SMW hacks (Yoshi's Strange Quest), but I didn't start out that way. I had no ASM knowledge and my first attempts at making a hack were questionable at best. However, you can still see some of my core design philosophies in this initial version of MSQ, so it might be interesting to check out if you want to compare it to MSQ V1.6 or YSQ V1.4 (MYSQ). Hard to imagine I came from this to being able to disassemble entire games in a week or two, isn't it. XD

As for how Azentiger fits into this, he is an LPer who played various games, particularly SMW hacks.. During 2010-2013, he LPed and rated many hacks that were submitted to SMWCentral (and a few that were sent as requests or ones he did for fun). Naturally, he played mine (episode 066), and since it wasn't very good, he gave it a D+ rating (he played V1.4 for episode 115, where he gave it a C+). This is what pushed me to make MSQ the best it could be. However, the influence this LP had on me extends past MSQ and went into many of my future projects. I consider this LP a pivotal moment for me due to this. I have lots of respect for Azentiger for doing these hack LPs, as it gave unknown, first time hack authors a valuable opportunity to see their hack being played (this also extends to other LPers who did something similar, such as levelengine when he essentially took over this role for a few years after Azentiger stopped). I doubt I'd be where I am today without his input and I can't thank him enough for it. The least I can do to thank him is bring some attention to his channel. His current subscriber count is criminally low (289) and I feel he deserves a lot more than that. It's a shame he hasn't uploaded anything in 7 years, but maybe some newfound interest in his channel would get him motivated to make new LPs? There is a new generation of beginner SMW hackers to inspire and I'd like to see Azentiger inspire them like he did for me.

The list I posted should make it easy to find all the SMW hack LPs starting with the first one he rated, especially since Youtube doesn't bother to put many of them in the "Up Next" video recommendation. Said list also links to each hack (if I could find it. Big thanks to Zandro, as a lot of these hacks would otherwise be lost) if you want to see the version Azentiger played for yourself. If you want to see some of Azentiger's funniest moments from the SMW Hack LPs to get an idea of what his videos can be like, here is a montage of them made by levelengine. If you found those moments funny, consider subscribing to Azentiger. Also, if you watch these LPs, you'll get to see a bit of what SMW hacking was like back in 2010-2013. SMW hacking has changed a ton in just 10 years, and it might be a good idea to look back to be able to appreciate how far its come. Plus, some of these 7-10 year old hacks need to be seen to be believed, many of which appear in the montage. Watch episodes 007, 014, 023, 043, 056, 071-075, 077, 101, 112, 124, 128, and/or 165 and try to imagine how the hack authors thought these hacks were worthy of uploading in the state they were in (if you're a newer hack moderator, imagine how you'd react if you were tasked with moderating one of these hacks). Seeing as how Azentiger is the only person to have LPed many of these hacks and that a lot of these hacks would have been lost if not for Zandro's database, it's fascinating seeing the stuff Azentiger didn't show in his LPs for one reason or another. He definitely dodged a few bullets in a few cases. XD

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*Cow lands on top of Yoshifanatic*
Oooo.. that's gotta hurt! Someone's bull-headed decision to launch a cow has left Yoshifanatic udderly incapable of continuing his presentation until he is able to moooooove the cow off of him.

Tune in tomorrow, where Yoshifanatic will showcase an SNES mouse compatible game!

Click here to continue onto Day 2

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My Hacks:
Mario's Strange Quest V1.6
Yoshi's Inside Story (on hold)
Yoshi's Strange Quest V1.3 / V1.3.1 Beta 4.6 / Latest Test Build (Mario & Yoshi's Strange Quests)

Other stuff:
My SMW/SMAS/SMAS+W disassembly
Yoshifanatic's Discord Server: A place for fans of my stuff and/or Yoshi to chat with others.
Holy shit a dissaembly of EWJ 2. Maybe i can do something very interesting with that
------------------------------------------------------

Youtube
Twitter
SMWControlLibX GitHub
My Discord Server
Fanatical like a Demon
Dude this is some mad crazy work! Yoshi Island is one of my favorite games but funny enough I have yet to beat it. I'm waiting to hook up my SNES again bc I don't want to beat it via emulator. This was a nice read thru on the trivia and things you talked about in each games. I especially liked the back story you gave on Azentiger and how it influenced you. For me it was similar in that I started a kaizo hack out of my amazement to the original kaizo romhack and wanted ProtonJonSA to play it. Sadly that never happened. Wow, congrats on 10 years dude!!!
Major thanks to Suika Ibuki for layout!
SMAS Soundtrack Status: 100% finished
YI Soundtrack Status: 100%
YI Unsampled Soundtrack Status: 100%
NSMB Soundtrack Status: 7.89%
Killer Instinct Soundtrack Status: 14.63%
SPC Thread
From our family to you, keep your pants dry, your dreams wet, and remember, hugs not drugs.
Earthworm Jim 2? Does that mean that you disassembled a Bitmasters sound driver variant in the process? I'm already aware of Plok from the Discord discussions.

I ask because I myself have only done some reverse engineering on Home Alone (and a little bit of the Mask, though I've abandoned that for now so that I can do these by version order), which is the earliest game (and the first version) to use the Bitmasters sound driver.
A Plok disassembly!!!

As someone who grew up playing that game a ton as a small kid, you have no idea how cool is seeing its code up for everyone to see/edit.
Sadly I'm not too familiar with Eearthwork Jim and Plok, but man, churning out disassemblies like that is positively insane. Can't wait to see what the next couple of days will bring!

Are the github links broken or am I missing something?

(fun fact: i once came up with the name "plok" independently when I programmed some game on my school calculator and mashed the keyboard to name it.)

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christ, yoshifanatic.

a question for the smarter folks: how useful will a yoshi's island disassembly be for yoshi's island hacking? as is, we have a pretty hard time promoting it given... the limited resources and accessibility.

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I loved that you did the disassembly on Plok. I always felt that was a game that was truly overlooked, and of course, anything with the Follin brothers, I'm a sucker for. You were really detailed in your descriptions, and I learned a lot about these games you wouldn't know otherwise just from looking at it. I also didn't realize that laugh sample from Plok was in another game. It should be noted that laugh was actually Tim Follin laughing, but of course, modified somewhat. :P

Good work! :)

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Click here to enter the world of mediocre!
GROOVY!

The Earthworm Jim 2 and Plok! disassemblies are super cool! Man, I can't wait to see more of them in following days!
Puyo Puyo Tetris 2 is available now! JOIN THE HYPE TRAIN! And don't forget to discuss the latest happs in this thread and follow @PuyoOfficial on Twitter for updates!
And so the Courier who had cheated death in the cemetery outside Goodsprings cheated death once again, and the Mojave wasteland was forever changed.
“Even if you personally are so dissatisfied with life that you want the world to end, surely the cruel reality is that it will continue on, unchanging. All the better for someone perfectly content, like me.”
Aya Shameimaru, Touhou Suzunaan ~ Forbidden Scrollery
Technically speaking, I am a brick. But three disassemblies? That sounds like it took an insane amount of work. Kudos for that alone
Originally posted by anonimzwx
Holy shit a dissaembly of EWJ 2. Maybe i can do something very interesting with that


If you do, then I'll look forward to it!

Originally posted by LadiesMan217
Dude this is some mad crazy work! Yoshi Island is one of my favorite games but funny enough I have yet to beat it. I'm waiting to hook up my SNES again bc I don't want to beat it via emulator. This was a nice read thru on the trivia and things you talked about in each games. I especially liked the back story you gave on Azentiger and how it influenced you. For me it was similar in that I started a kaizo hack out of my amazement to the original kaizo romhack and wanted ProtonJonSA to play it. Sadly that never happened. Wow, congrats on 10 years dude!!!


I'm glad you liked what I'm showing off! ^_^

Incidentally, ProtonJon's LPs are also where I discovered SMW hacking, so like you, I wanted to make a hack for him to play (which of course never happened). With how things played out though, it's actually kind of amazing that the timing of me posting my first hack would lead me to discovering Azentiger, who I actually like better than ProtonJon in some ways. If I posted my hack later than I did, Azentiger likely wouldn't have LPed it the day I posted it (it ended up being his last LP of 2010). It was a case of me being in the right place at the right time. XD

Originally posted by KungFuFurby
Earthworm Jim 2? Does that mean that you disassembled a Bitmasters sound driver variant in the process? I'm already aware of Plok from the Discord discussions.

I ask because I myself have only done some reverse engineering on Home Alone (and a little bit of the Mask, though I've abandoned that for now so that I can do these by version order), which is the earliest game (and the first version) to use the Bitmasters sound driver.


Yes, I disassembled the sound driver. Every one of the games I disassembled has had its sound engine disassembled, so if you've yet to look at the sound driver of any of the games I disassembled, then this will help with your research.

Originally posted by Moltz
A Plok disassembly!!!

As someone who grew up playing that game a ton as a small kid, you have no idea how cool is seeing its code up for everyone to see/edit.


You're welcome! :)

Originally posted by WhiteYoshiEgg
Sadly I'm not too familiar with Eearthwork Jim and Plok, but man, churning out disassemblies like that is positively insane. Can't wait to see what the next couple of days will bring!

Are the github links broken or am I missing something?

(fun fact: i once came up with the name "plok" independently when I programmed some game on my school calculator and mashed the keyboard to name it.)


That's good, as it's going to get more insane over the course of C3. XD

Regarding the Github links, I'm going to update those when I'm able to put the disassemblies on Github. I'm actually having trouble with it though, because Github is not doing what I expect. If I upload, say, the "Global" folder, the .exe programs are uploaded, but not any of the .asm/.txt files or the folders inside the Global folder. Also, apparently I can't upload a folder with more than 100 files in it, which is going to make this more annoying. I'm new to Github, so maybe I'm missing something incredibly obvious?

Also, that's neat. I wonder if the makers of Plok did something similar? XD

Originally posted by idol
christ, yoshifanatic.

a question for the smarter folks: how useful will a yoshi's island disassembly be for yoshi's island hacking? as is, we have a pretty hard time promoting it given... the limited resources and accessibility.


I know. XD

To answer your question, it's tough to say in YI's case as there already exist other YI disassemblies (I mentioned one in the YI section of my post, but there might be others). If mine was the only one, then a disassembly is useful because it makes it far easier to create tools and other resources for that game. Not to mention that a full disassembly allows for more flexible editing of the ROM, especially as they mature and get better documented

Also, while there are other YI disassemblies, my disassembly has flexible pointers, making it easier to add/remove stuff without something breaking. At least, on the SNES side. I had to learn SuperFX ASM to be able to do the SuperFX side of things and it's still confusing to me. That side likely still has hardcoded pointers.

Originally posted by Lotica
I loved that you did the disassembly on Plok. I always felt that was a game that was truly overlooked, and of course, anything with the Follin brothers, I'm a sucker for. You were really detailed in your descriptions, and I learned a lot about these games you wouldn't know otherwise just from looking at it. I also didn't realize that laugh sample from Plok was in another game. It should be noted that laugh was actually Tim Follin laughing, but of course, modified somewhat. :P

Good work! :)


I'm glad to have done it, too. It's a pretty fascinating little game and it was cool learning about a game I never played before. Despite its flaws, this is definitely a game worth checking out!

Incidentally, since you liked the descriptions, one of the games I'll be showing tomorrow has quite a large amount of technical stuff for it. It's actually kind of impressive just how much interesting stuff this one game does, especially considering the type of game it is.

Originally posted by kamekku14
GROOVY!

The Earthworm Jim 2 and Plok! disassemblies are super cool! Man, I can't wait to see more of them in following days!


I'm glad to hear that! ^_^

Originally posted by SLBros.
Technically speaking, I am a brick. But three disassemblies? That sounds like it took an insane amount of work. Kudos for that alone


I did take quite a bit of work. XD Although, if you think just 3 disassemblies is insane, wait until you see how many more disassemblies I did.

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My Hacks:
Mario's Strange Quest V1.6
Yoshi's Inside Story (on hold)
Yoshi's Strange Quest V1.3 / V1.3.1 Beta 4.6 / Latest Test Build (Mario & Yoshi's Strange Quests)

Other stuff:
My SMW/SMAS/SMAS+W disassembly
Yoshifanatic's Discord Server: A place for fans of my stuff and/or Yoshi to chat with others.
Oh wow. Hope people can make great use of this stuff, especially for YI. (and plok, always good to see plok love) Looking forward to your other releases!
Ah, Yoshi's Island, the game I want to work on it more in-depth.

Originally posted by yoshifanatic
This game makes heavy usage of the SuperFX chip. It isn't just graphical stuff either.

Can definitively confirm. Camera, Yoshi's phyiscs, sprite tiles, sprite interaction (between sprites and sprites and sprites and ground), etc. are all handled by Super FX.

Originally posted by yoshifanatic
Despite what the YI ROM map implies or Raidenthequick's disassembly (which I occasionally checked to help me with some of the more confusing stuff this game does), the ROM is technically not laid out like $00-$3F. It's actually $00-$17, $4C-$5F. YI makes use of the HiROM mirror for everything past bank 17, so it's a bit misleading to refer to that area as $18-$3F.

Still gives me a bit of headaches. ^^

Originally posted by yoshifanatic
There isn't much else I can talk about, as this disassembly took me so long to do, I wanted to move on with another game. I didn't bother to look super deep into a lot of things.

Maybe I can add in some fun facts:
  • Yoshi's Island has got many more Map16 pages than SMW as it handles interaction per page, not per ranges. Each page contains the following information: Interaction type (which is bitwise, btw), special interaction (when more than the interaction type needs to be handled) and slope type. The tile number is only used on special interaction for fine tuning (e.g. the numbered platforms which are all on the same page but still can be stepped for different amounts, not to mention there's a left and right side of the block)
  • There are two kinds of special feet interaction: A generic one for each interaction point and a second one, seperated into the two outer and the inner interaction points, and only the highest interaction points run for the latter.
  • Pipe interaction is handled wierdly. For each type of interaction point (sidways, head and feet) there is what I call "post interaction points" which handles block specific animations (e.g. push sprites, bop head and landing) but also pipe animation. Yoshi's Island will detect pipes before but here is where things get messy: Sideways pipes are, as expected, detected in the special interaction, upward pipes are deected in the post-interaction points only (the special interaction for Yoshi's head do nothing) whereas downward pipes are detected at the centre of Yoshi's feet.
  • My favourite one is that most layer 3 sprite are contrary to what you might think, constructed with HDMA and a layer 3 triangle and aren't dynamically drawn. Plotting is just too much for Super FX to handle, not to mention there would be too much stuff on screen to be updated as well. The sole exception? Shark Chomp which is just changing the tiles on the tilemap. Layer 2 bosses are similarily handled through HDMA.
  • Relatedly, the decoration on the title screen and the castle destruction cutscenes are surprisingly plotted and are not just constructed with individual sprites. Guess that it was too easy to hit the limit that not too many sprites can be on a single scanline, eh?
  • Tile decoration/pattern is randomised—a level will almost never look the same when you reenter it. With that, I don't mean the large decorations (such as the flowers in What's Gusty Taste Like) but e.g. which ground tile is placed as well as the colours of the coloured cement blocks and 3D bricks.
  • Yoshi's Island handles its message boxes quite cleverly as while they are on layer 3, the background/foreground tilemap never disappears and even when you close it, the whole tilemap looks fine. How is it done? Easy: Simply put the message box relative to the screen instead of at a fixed position of the tilemap (this can be best seen if you take two screenshots when the message box is active but the camera is at a different position) and restore the tilemap afterwards.
That's all what I can think of right now.

Originally posted by yoshifanatic
I used to think that the 16x16 tile mode was a useless, gimmicky feature of the SNES ... until I saw how this game made use of it. What you sacrifice in tile variety, you make up with faster tilemap uploads, allowing for effects like these with much less risk of running out of V-Blank time:

Reminds me of Shark Chomp from Yoshi's Island as layer 2 and 3 are 16x16 tiles as well (after all, you don't need a big variety of tiles in backgrounds) which really saves on processing power and f-blank time (the effort would be quadrupled if Yoshi's Island used 8x8 tiles as it is with layer 1).
That, and it allows for larger backgrounds (seriously, the height of YI's layer 2 backgrounds is just insane) for fewer VRAM.

Edit: Forgot to finish the second paragraph and typo.

--------------------
Okay, my layout looks ugly.
i'll need to give the OP a more thorough reading when im less tired but man this is very impressive and i hope ppl put these to good use!

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soundcloud / bandcamp / twitter / battle of the bits / buy our album
This is incredible work Yoshifanatic!
I don't know very much about ASM, but even someone as uneducated in that field as me can realize just how much work was put into those disassemblies!

I'm looking forward to what you have to show off in the upcoming days!
Just a heads up, but I figured out what I needed to do to get my disassemblies on GitHub. I just had to edit all the 0 byte placeholder files so they contain something. I'll be able to get the other days' disassemblies up quicker.

Originally posted by DeppySlide
Oh wow. Hope people can make great use of this stuff, especially for YI. (and plok, always good to see plok love) Looking forward to your other releases!

Originally posted by Sinc-X
i'll need to give the OP a more thorough reading when im less tired but man this is very impressive and i hope ppl put these to good use!


I hope other can make good use of it too!

Originally posted by MarioFanGamer
*Various stuff about YI*


That's a lot of really interesting stuff! Kind of a shame I wasn't able to look super deep into YI's code, but this game just burnt me out. YI had way more code to disassemble than any other game I looked at. Perhaps sometime after C3, I'll dive back into YI's code and see if I can learn more interesting stuff about it.

Originally posted by Final Theory
This is incredible work Yoshifanatic!


Thanks! ^_^

Originally posted by Minish Yoshi
I don't know very much about ASM, but even someone as uneducated in that field as me can realize just how much work was put into those disassemblies!

I'm looking forward to what you have to show off in the upcoming days!


Glad to hear that! ^_^

--------------------
My Hacks:
Mario's Strange Quest V1.6
Yoshi's Inside Story (on hold)
Yoshi's Strange Quest V1.3 / V1.3.1 Beta 4.6 / Latest Test Build (Mario & Yoshi's Strange Quests)

Other stuff:
My SMW/SMAS/SMAS+W disassembly
Yoshifanatic's Discord Server: A place for fans of my stuff and/or Yoshi to chat with others.
I know a friend who loves (and hates) Plok, maybe i'll make him a hack with disassembly that is now available......................................................................................................

Interesting stuff as usual!
Day 1
Day 2
Day 3
Day 4

With Day 1 behind us, let's crank the craziness dial up a few more notches as I show more disassemblies!

(Side note: I updated the Azentiger SMW Hack LP list, to fix the hack download links for Zunar Mario World, and episodes 148, 151, 158, and 162 so they point to the version Azentiger actually played. In addition, episodes 010, 022, 034, and 113 now have a download link. Thanks to Zandro for pointing the former out and giving me the method that would find the latter.
Also, I got the Day 1 disassemblies uploaded on GitHub. Turns out all I needed to do was put something in all the blank placeholder files. In addition, there is now a link to the EWJ2 manual in Day 1's post).

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Jurassic Park Disassembly
Github Link



*Stomp*
*Stomp*
*Stomp*
*T-Rex Roar* Ughh, excuse me. Man, what did I eat last night that would do that?

Supported ROMs (1)
- USA

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SMW/SMAS/SMAS+W Disassembly
Github Link

Standalone SMAS Game Patches



"Wait, this disassembly supports that many ROMs? He must be joking!"
I'm not. :P


Supported ROMs (23 total)
- Super Mario World (USA, Japan, PAL, PAL Rev.1, Arcade)
- Super Mario All-Stars (USA, Japan, Japan Rev.1, PAL)
- Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (USA, PAL)
- (Hack) Super Mario Bros. (USA, PAL, Japan)
- (Hack) Super Mario Bros. Lost Levels (USA, PAL, Japan)
- (Hack) Super Mario Bros. 2 (USA, PAL, Japan)
- (Hack) Super Mario Bros. 3 (USA, PAL, Japan)

-----------------------------------------------

Goof Troop Disassembly
Github Link


My foot hurts for some reason. I'm gonna to blame it on this game for no reason!

Supported ROMs (1)
- USA

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Wario's Woods Disassembly
Github Link


Ad: Rompin', stompin' Warios! Buy one now, and get another one at 0% off! Your kids will surely WAHnt this WAHnderful toy!
Toad: *Angry face* Man, you couldn't pay me enough to write such slop if I were a marketer!

Supported ROMs (1)
- USA

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Holy *Beep*!! It's a dinosaur! Except I'm not talking about those dinosaurs, but rather an ancient licensed video game from the Jurassic era of video gaming. Don't worry, we're not going arms deep into a big pile of dinosaur poopy. Considering this is a licensed title, this game is a surprisingly good showcase for the SNES's capabilities, even though the game is flawed from a gameplay standpoint.

Here are some interesting technical details about this game:
- This game is divided up into two ways: 3/4 overhead view exterior areas and Wolfenstein 3D-esque first person view interior areas. The former is pretty standard stuff, so here is a small snippet showing what the interior areas look like:



How does the game manage this 3D perspective? With absolutely genius usage of mode 7, that's how! Here are the specifics:
+ All 256 mode 7 tiles used are a different solid color.
+ Because all the tiles are solid colors, the individual tiles are treated as individual pixels when displayed on the tilemap.
+ The mode 7 tilemap is squashed a bit to be within the goggles. Despite what you might think, the entire 128x128 mode 7 tilemap is used.
+ Despite what you might think, the entire screen is being rendered, so no active display time is being sacrificed for more V-Blank time.
+ 5 ROM banks are dedicated to unrolled loop code, presumably to handle the pixel plotting.
+ The goggles/HUD/Cattle prod electricity is a sprite overlay
+ No custom chips are being used (although the DSP-1 was planned, but ultimately not used).
Since updating a tilemap is faster than updating tiles, it saves a lot of V-Blank time and simplifies a lot of pixel plotting calculations.

- This game came out the year before Wolfenstein 3D was ported to the SNES.

- The game starts with a more traditional usage of mode 7, where a representation of Isle Nubular (with the Jurassic Park logo on it) spins around a bit before the camera zooms in.

- For some bizarre reason, FastROM addressing is turned off in the interior areas. I assume this is a bug, although turning it back on seems to have no effect at speeding things up.

- This game supports the SNES Mouse, specifically for the interior areas. It's not the most exciting use of the mouse, especially considering this game doesn't allow you to look up/down while in first person, but the devs did consider it.

- At the time of this writing, there is no Cutting Room Floor page for this game. So, here are some things I found while digging in the code:
+ Blood splatter texture:


+ Unused outdoor message boxes containing indoor related text, suggesting this version may have originally been more like the NES version.
+ Bone crunching sound, which was mentioned in pre-release materials. It was meant for when you get eaten by the T-rex, but removed because Nintendo thought it sounded too realistic. I'll let you guys be the judge:

- This game has a surround sound system, which makes sense as this is a game that attempts to be immersive. This is handled by sending the X/Y position data to the SPC700, which presumably alters the panning and/or volume of the sound to simulate the sound coming from a specific spot.

- This game has the ability to load music/samples in the middle of gameplay without pausing. The game fades out the music before doing this and beings playing the new track shortly after. Also, sound effects are still able to play during this. Unlike Earthworm Jim 2, no sample streaming is involved, so I assume the game is uploading a little bit of the SPC700 data each frame instead of uploading all of it at once.

- The computer terminals in this game generate fractal based patterns, which is a neat little touch. These patterns are drawn over time and there are 8 of them in total.



- If you idle for long enough in an exterior area, a Mr. DNA text box will appear giving interesting dinosaur related trivia. There are a surprising amount of these.

- This game makes use of the pseudo-hires mode in order to make the text boxes transparent. If you've ever played this game in ZSNES, ZSNES doesn't support this, which results in the text boxes being opaque.



Note that I'm taking an image of the emulator window because this transparency requires a CRT like filter to appear as intended. Otherwise, layer 3 will have a line between each column of pixels.

- This game's HP system isn't an HP system but rather a "damage taken" system. Ie. It starts at #$0000, and once it goes past #$00FF, that's when you lose a life.

- If you enter a dark room without picking up the battery for night vision goggles, your DT is set to #$0200. I guess the programmers wanted to make extra sure you were dead in this situation. XD

- The elevator music in this game is done by loading a massive sample and then playing one note, similar to how I handled the Yoshi voice clips and fart noises in YSQ. They'd probably be the easiest songs to port if one wanted to (although good luck getting those ports past the moderators). XD

- This game uploads a separate code block to the SPC700 that initializes the state of the SPC700, which then gets overwritten with the rest of the engine. I suppose that's one way of saving a bit of ARAM.

- The title screen uses mode 3.

- This game has a really good soundtrack. To my knowledge this game doesn't use the any music from the movie, but it's still great nonetheless.



As for my personal experiences:
- For the longest time, I had no idea how to finish the second mission because since I didn't know that it was possible to push a box. To be fair, the game never hints that this is possible and it's not my first idea of how I would prevent the raptors from getting into the Visitor Center.

- I'm pretty sure my grandma got me this game, as she remembers getting me a game that "I got stuck on for the longest time".

- The T-rex shows up in a couple spots in this game. As a kid, i quickly learned not to go to those spots because the sound of the T-rex roaring scared me as a kid.

- Whenever you exit from a computer terminal, there is a random chance that a strange screech noise will play. This also scared me, especially since this rather tense, atmospheric track is what plays in the interior areas.

- For the longest time, I had no idea what the random letters were for. Only recently did I find out they were for a contest and have no purpose in game.

- I remember drawing a map for this game's interior areas, since this game was made before in-game maps were the standard. It can be surprisingly easy to get lost in some of these buildings if you don't know how they're laid out.

- I tend to shoot all the Gallimimuses even though the game tells you not to because they may stampede.

- I almost always use the rocket launcher and bolas snare rifle because the weapon balancing is absolutely broken in their favor.

- I had the manual for this game, and it had a few bits that were pretty amusing, like how "Dinosaurs don't stop hunting just because you're on the phone!" as the explanation for why the text boxes are transparent, or how if you get hit by the giant dragonfly, you're lucky it's not a mosquito because otherwise, a future geneticist might dig out your DNA from amber in a million years and use it to create clones of you for a "Paleontologist Park".

-----------------------------------------------

Have any of you guys ever heard of this obscure SNES game called "Super Mario World"? I had it when I was a kid, and it was surprisingly good! Wait, there is a fan site for it? AND it's been active for 15 years? I didn't know! :O

Regarding the technicals, there isn't much to say that you guys probably don't know already. As it was a launch title, the game is basically a showcase of the SNES's capabilities as it makes use of many of them. Mode 1, Mode 7, IRQs, HDMA, color math, windows, etc.

As for my personal experiences:
- I've always found this game to be really easy, aside from Tubular and Outrageous, even ignoring how the cape and Yoshi break this game wide open. It's to a point where it feels like someone is joking if they say that this game is hard.

- One of my first exposures to this game was at a cousin's house, which was what eventually lead me to getting a copy myself.

- I thought the special world palette change was a bug the first time I saw it happen.

- My first exposure to SMW hacking being, of course, from ProtonJon's LPs. Like quite a few people from that time, I wanted to make a hack for him to play, not knowing that he stopped LPing SMW hacks before 2010. Nowadays, I'd be more interested in seeing Azentiger player YSQ V1.4 than, for reasons mentioned in the Day 1 post.

- SMW was the first ROM I downloaded on the internet. At the time, I found it absolutely amazing that I could play SNES games on my computer. I did not discover emulation until after I turned 18, when I moved into my grandparents' place and they gave me internet access.

- I found the SMW underground music creepy as a kid, to the point where it was the music that would play in my nightmares. Considering I have a level in YSQ containing elements of my nightmares, this is an odd omission (which I'll definitely correct before V1.4 is done).

- I'm not sure what inspired this, but I sometimes refer to small Mario in this game as "smart-alekey Mario" (if I had to guess, it had to due with the way Mario's face looked in his small poses). I even created a specific playstyle revolving around this, where I don't grab any powerups, don't run, and always spin jump.

- I remember being stuck in the Forest of Illusion as a kid, since I couldn't figure out where the one exit out of the Forest was. Chocolate Island 3 also gave me similar trouble.

- The secret exit of Valley Ghost House was the last secret exit I ever found.

- I remember calling the Dino Rhinos/Torches "piggies", because they looked more like pigs than dinosaurs to me.

-----------------------------------------------

"Why I don't play" - Use of FOMO tactics to pressure buyers, 3 barely enhanced ports, next to no extras aside from soundtracks, overpriced, other miscellaneous issues, already own a physical copy of all 3 games and a working console to play them on.
...
Oh, we're talking about the SNES SMAS? Disregard what I said then.


Regarding SMAS/SMAS+W, I've shown this disassembly off for several C3s in a row, but since it's constantly evolving, I usually have something new to show off about it. This time around, I added support for all 4 versions of the original SMAS, so now this one disassembly supports all 7 official releases of SMAS in addition to all 5 of SMW's. On top of this, it now supports 4 new hacks that create a standalone Japanese version of the SMAS games. Because my disassembly now supports a Japanese version of SMAS, it became possible to do this. These ROMs are based off of the 2nd Japanese version of SMAS, which has the bug fixes made for SMAS+W.
Part of the reason I made the Japanese ROMs is because I released the new version of my SMW/SMAS/SMAS+W disassembly early in order to add the asset extraction stuff. That way, even the people who knew I released it early would still have something to be surprised about. Also, we all know how stupid Nintendo is about this sort of stuff, so making my disassemblies safer to distribute/host was more important than keeping my tradition of releasing big things during C3.

As for the technicals, I don't think there is much to go over. It's 4 NES games ported over and enhanced for the SNES, setting the standard for how to properly do an NES to SNES conversion (To see how you do this wrong, look at Ninja Gaiden Trilogy). Instead, I'll talk about some of the interesting stuff I noticed while disassembling the regular versions of SMAS.

- Did you know that the Japanese version of SMAS's title screen has animations for Birdo's eyes, the bob-omb's fuse, and the goomba's mouth? The data for these animations exist in the USA version, but they're not used. On top of this, the USA version adds an unused animation for the spiny.



- There seems to be the remains of a copy detection routine in both the Japanese versions of SMAS. However, it's not called, and the tables don't line up with any code that would make sense. You can see this in ROUTINE_SMAS_IntroProcessXX_FadeOutToAndInitializeTitleScreen().

- Toad's shoes are colored differently on the sleeping Mario screen between the USA and Japanese versions. This difference is so subtle, the users on my Discord server couldn't spot it when I showed a side by side comparison and had them guess what the difference was, even when some were looking at the image in an image editor! Here is the side by side comparison:



If I hadn't been disassembling all these different SMAS versions, do you think anyone else would have found this?

- The main difference between the J1 and J2 ROMs is that the J2 ROM has the same bug fixes that were done for SMAS+W, such as the changed pause behavior in SMB2U.

If you want more SMAS related trivia, check out my Summer 2020 C3 thread and/or the SMAS+W fun facts file from that thread.


As for my personal experience with this game:
- I had SMAS, not SMAS+W.

- My main character of choice in both SMBLL and SMB2U was Luigi.

- I don't know why, but I used to like digging out all the sand in the desert levels in SMB2U.

- As this was how I first experienced SMB1, the odd brick physics never bothered me.

- The "3 coin service" thing that can happen in SMB2U's slot machine was my "thing that happened to me once as a kid, never figured out how to make it happen, thought I imagined it for the longest time, realized it was real all along" experience.

- I know about most of these games' intentional secrets, yet I'm still discovering new things about these games 20 years later, like the red note block in 3-7 of SMB3.

- For quite some time at first, I didn't know how to beat birdo in SMB2. For whatever reason, it didn't occur to me that I could jump on the eggs.

- In SMB2U, I have a player tic, where I enter the hawkmouth while crouching. In addition, sometimes I'll play through a level while crouching as much as possible due to how goofy it looks (the fact that Luigi's jump is so floaty helps with navigation).

- There is a bug in SMB2U where if you enter certain vases in the cave in 6-1, you can duplicate the mushroom blocks. I remember I once attempted to fill up this room as much as possible.

- 6-5 in SMB3 stumped me as a kid, because I never considered that I could carry a shell while flying.

- 7-8 was another roadblock in SMB3, since the fire spitting nipper would always get me and I'd always be small by that point. 7-7 also proved hard, though I don't remember why.

- I don't think I've once beaten SMBLL without getting a game over, although that shouldn't be surprising.

-----------------------------------------------

Hold on a sec, I need to go get my laptop so I can talk about the next disassembly. *Fires rope gun* *Rope gun hits laptop* *Rope gun reels laptop in* There we go! Wait, how do I put it down without breaking it? Oh no! I didn't think this through!

Would it surprise you if I told you a good chunk of the ~40 SNES games I owned as a kid were licensed titles, like Goof Troop? You might be thinking that that sounds pretty bad, but for the most part, the licensed SNES games I have aren't too bad with some of them being surprisingly good. Case in point, Goof Troop is one such game.
If you've never played this, it's a bit like The Legend of Zelda: Four Sword Adventures with a bit of Super Mario Bros. 2 thrown in. Each of this game's levels are like a Zelda dungeon, where you need to solve puzzles, defeat enemies, and pick up tools to help you, and your primary way of fighting back is by throwing things. This game can be quite a bit of fun, particularly if you can play it in the Co-Op mode.
The main problem with this game is that it's a bit on the easy side and it's very short, but everything else about this game is quite good.

As for the technical stuff:
- A massive chunk of this game's RAM is used as a decompression buffer for this game's sprite graphics. Even then, only two sprites have their graphics stored uncompressed, which are the barrel throwing native seen during the second boss fight and the final boss.

- I didn't look through all the decompressed sprite graphics, but I did notice some graphics I'm 99% sure are unused.


In the above image, I don't remember ever seeing a sign, log, raft(?), ice cube, seashell, tin can/spring or rock.

- This game is 512 KB, yet there is a reference to bank 90 in the code. Either this game was originally planned to be longer or that was linked to debug functions that were removed from the final game.

- The soundtrack is fairly good. The level themes might be a tad repetitive for how long you might listen to them in game, but not to the point where it'd be annoying.


As for my personal experiences:
- A couple of this game's puzzles stumped me as a kid, such as the last block puzzle before the final boss. When I replayed this game again while disassembling it, I was able to breeze through the game for the most part, but this puzzle still required me to think it through.

- I do remember playing this game in Co-Op as a kid with my two younger brothers, and I think my mom as well.

- The rope gun is quite fun to use. It lets you stun/knock back pirates, defeat smaller enemies, grab distant throwable/consumable items, and connect to hooks to form a bridge. Being able to knock the pirates around is quite satisfying.

- For whatever reason, I had some kidney stone -esque pain one of the days I was working on this disassembly and it pretty much stopped me from working on it. Thankfully, it went away the next day.

-----------------------------------------------

Let's talk about my favorite "Line up X of the same object in a row" game, Wario's Woods!

Regarding the technicals:
- There is an unused music track and a duplicate of track 1A that crashes the game when played. I would post an .spc of the unused track, but...

- Unlike most SNES games, this game's music is undumpable. Why? Because the music is processed by the main CPU rather than the SPC700 (but is obviously sent over after being processed). You'd think it'd have to do with this game also being released on the NES, but the NES version has different music. This game was released well into the SNES's life, so why the programmers didn't use the N-SPC engine is anyone's guess.

- This game makes use of an AI opponent in one of its modes. I don't know much about programming an AI that's meant to act like a human player, but the AI opponents seem to know what they're doing, although they make some odd decisions at times.

- This is likely the first game where Toad was given a starring role.

- This game makes use of some voice clips. I suspect it's handled in a similar way as that old Addmusick build Vitor Vilela posted years ago that featured sample streaming, where these samples are loaded when needed.



As for my personal experiences:
- I'm pretty good at this game. In addition to beating both difficulties of the Vs. COM mode, I've also make it to round 150+ in the Round Game. I think I also got a gold rank for all 3 time trial difficulties, but I'm not sure.

- I only recently got to play the NES version, thanks to that version being available on Nintendo's (still very lame) NSO service. While I prefer the SNES version, the NES version is not bad at all. Though it did take me a bit to get used to the fact there is no X button.

-----------------------------------------------

Huh? The computer systems suddenly shut down! *A loud roar is heard* And I think the dinosaurs are running loose!

You guys are going to have to wait until I sort this mess out before I can continue my presentation, where I'll be showing off a quirky Nintendo published RPG.

*T-Rex Roar*

I gotta hurry! See you tomorrow!

Click here to continue onto Day 3

--------------------
My Hacks:
Mario's Strange Quest V1.6
Yoshi's Inside Story (on hold)
Yoshi's Strange Quest V1.3 / V1.3.1 Beta 4.6 / Latest Test Build (Mario & Yoshi's Strange Quests)

Other stuff:
My SMW/SMAS/SMAS+W disassembly
Yoshifanatic's Discord Server: A place for fans of my stuff and/or Yoshi to chat with others.
My goodness, the disassemblies just keep on coming! Hopefully they will prove to be useful.

It is somewhat of a surprise that you had a disassembly of Goof Troop, as that was one of the games I had predicted you would disassemble. I guess I just got lucky!

Originally posted by yoshifanatic
You guys are going to have to wait until I sort this mess out before I can continue my presentation, where I'll be showing off a quirky Nintendo published RPG.


I'm not entriely sure what this game is, but I'll guess.
Earthbound?
Pages: « 1 2 3 » Link
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