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Yoshifanatic's ASM Showoff: Part 11 (Day 4)
Forum Index - Sunken Ghost Ship - C3 Museum - Winter 2021 - Yoshifanatic's ASM Showoff: Part 11 (Day 4)
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Pages: « 1 2 3 » Link
Fanatical like a Demon
Holy shit I had no idea you'd disassemble Jurassic Park! One of the games I loved playing but never could finish. I recall you going to the Ship Interior and on certain spots, you'd randomly hear Raptor roars. One spot in particular you could see something at the top of your googles if you looked at a specific part of the top wall/ceiling. That interior always scared me. I also once got lost in the Raptor Pen Interior. I accidentally once made my way from the Raptor Pen Interior and found my way into the Visitor Center Interior. It was crazy! I remember specifically one Saturday morning waking up before anyone in the house and playing this game. It was raining hard that morning but it just added to the atmosphere of this game. Last thing I remember was walking around outside the Raptor Pen. Such good times... Imagine this game using the sa1 lol. How much would it speed up the 1st person view areas! Sadly, I can't comment much from the other games as I have never played them (or even heard of some) and I've already talked countless days about SMAS+W. Keep up the amazing work!!!
Major thanks to Suika Ibuki for layout!
SMAS Soundtrack Status: 100% finished
YI Soundtrack Status: 100%
YI Unsampled Soundtrack Status: 100%
NSMB Soundtrack Status: 7.89%
Killer Instinct Soundtrack Status: 14.63%
SPC Thread
From our family to you, keep your pants dry, your dreams wet, and remember, hugs not drugs.
All of these are amazing everything is great!

--------------------


You are challenged by Champion Daisy!

LAYOUT FOOTER:
Wow, that's a lot of neat details. I am surprised to know that HDMA can be used for music. That explains why EWJ2 has such a great soundtrack. I think it's the best games of the series. The first one I always found unfair and frustrating, but EWJ2 feels just right in difficulty and humor.

Now I understand how they did the cow screen. I wonder which games use the 8BBP to display such big images.

Great job sharing all these informations with us. #smrpg{y}
I never know what to comment on your threads because there's so much going on, but know that I really enjoy them. A wise man named Albert Einstein, who was also President of the United States, once said: "Yoshifanatic's ASM Showoff is the sauce of the C3 meal" and I think that "damn, that guy really knew what he was talking about"

One day I'll figure out what to comment on these threads, but until then thank you for showing so much cool weird shit, I love it

allow shy guy emojis in post footers you cowards!
Hey, Goof Troop. I actually kind of want to hack that. I personally find the layout of your disassemblies confusing, though.
Okay, you are really crazy, let's be honest.

Originally posted by yoshifanatic
How does the game manage this 3D perspective? With absolutely genius usage of mode 7, that's how!

It definitively shows that the SNES wasn't really weak, though it helps that the Mode 7 graphics is 8bpp linear so you don't need to perform complicated maths.

Originally posted by yoshifanatic
This game has a surround sound system, which makes sense as this is a game that attempts to be immersive. This is handled by sending the X/Y position data to the SPC700, which presumably alters the panning and/or volume of the sound to simulate the sound coming from a specific spot.

This game has the ability to load music/samples in the middle of gameplay without pausing. The game fades out the music before doing this and beings playing the new track shortly after. Also, sound effects are still able to play during this. Unlike Earthworm Jim 2, no sample streaming is involved, so I assume the game is uploading a little bit of the SPC700 data each frame instead of uploading all of it at once.

The four I/O ports are the biggest bottlenecks of SNES audio, both in data transfer and passing data from CPU to SPC.
Either way, besides the idea of dynamic surround, I find it even more interesting that the developers handles surround in this game with two bytes of data instead of one.
And writing only few bytes of data per frame is a cool way to transition between two songs. I surely hope to see this once in a new AddmusicK version as it can be very helpful when you are able to preserve the star and p-switch timer and having only one local song loaded at a time severely limits that while also keeping the star and p-switch music in tact.

Originally posted by yoshifanatic
This game makes use of the pseudo-hires mode in order to make the text boxes transparent. If you've ever played this game in ZSNES, ZSNES doesn't support this, which results in the text boxes being opaque.

I know this from byuu's old article which talks about emulator inaccuracy and how it affects the players and Jurassic Park was one of the many examples.

Originally posted by yoshifanatic
Unlike most SNES games, this game's music is undumpable. Why? Because the music is processed by the main CPU rather than the SPC700 (but is obviously sent over after being processed). You'd think it'd have to do with this game also being released on the NES, but the NES version has different music. This game was released well into the SNES's life, so why the programmers didn't use the N-SPC engine is anyone's guess.

lol

--------------------
Okay, my layout looks ugly.
I can't believe there's still two more days of releases in this thread! I've actually been reposting these in the discord for the Video Game History Foundation, since this definitely seems up their alley.
Originally posted by Minish Yoshi
My goodness, the disassemblies just keep on coming! Hopefully they will prove to be useful.

It is somewhat of a surprise that you had a disassembly of Goof Troop, as that was one of the games I had predicted you would disassemble. I guess I just got lucky!

Originally posted by yoshifanatic
You guys are going to have to wait until I sort this mess out before I can continue my presentation, where I'll be showing off a quirky Nintendo published RPG.


I'm not entriely sure what this game is, but I'll guess.
Earthbound?


Yeah, I hope so too!

As for guessing Goof Troop, I'm curious about what inspired that? Did you have Goof Troop growing up or have played it with someone?

As for the guess of a Day 3 disassembly, that's interesting. We'll see if you're right tomorrow.

Originally posted by LadiesMan217
Holy shit I had no idea you'd disassemble Jurassic Park! One of the games I loved playing but never could finish. I recall you going to the Ship Interior and on certain spots, you'd randomly hear Raptor roars. One spot in particular you could see something at the top of your googles if you looked at a specific part of the top wall/ceiling. That interior always scared me. I also once got lost in the Raptor Pen Interior. I accidentally once made my way from the Raptor Pen Interior and found my way into the Visitor Center Interior. It was crazy! I remember specifically one Saturday morning waking up before anyone in the house and playing this game. It was raining hard that morning but it just added to the atmosphere of this game. Last thing I remember was walking around outside the Raptor Pen. Such good times... Imagine this game using the sa1 lol. How much would it speed up the 1st person view areas! Sadly, I can't comment much from the other games as I have never played them (or even heard of some) and I've already talked countless days about SMAS+W. Keep up the amazing work!!!


One of the things I found really neat about this game, where unlike a lot of the other Jurassic Park 1 games that focus more on action (or, other things with the Sega CD and 3D0 versions), this one attempts to capture the spirit of the movie with some scary/tense moments. Jurassic Park 1 is one of my favorite movies, so it's cool that this game took this approach. It made for a really cool experience when playing this game as a kid for the first time, much like in your case.

Plus, I have to give the devs kudos for the amount of effort they put into this. In a time where many licensed games were quick cash grabs, the devs could have easily churned out a big dino turd and it would have sold a lot of copies anyway because Jurassic Park was the hot property of 1993. But, they didn't, and made a game that, while flawed, is both a technical marvel and is engaging to play.

Originally posted by OrangeBronzeDaisy
All of these are amazing everything is great!


Thanks! ^_^

Originally posted by Anorakun
Wow, that's a lot of neat details. I am surprised to know that HDMA can be used for music. That explains why EWJ2 has such a great soundtrack. I think it's the best games of the series. The first one I always found unfair and frustrating, but EWJ2 feels just right in difficulty and humor.

Now I understand how they did the cow screen. I wonder which games use the 8BBP to display such big images.

Great job sharing all these informations with us. #smrpg{y}


Yep. It's possible because the audio ports are mapped to $2140-$2143, and DMA/HDMA can affect any register in the $2100-$21FF range. There is even a DMA mode that writes to 4 consecutive registers at once, which seems like it was built with this in mind. And the HDMA sample streaming helped a lot with EWJ2's audio quality, as EWJ1's audio sounds noticeable more muffled than EWJ2's. I suspect EWJ1 stores all its sound effect samples in the ARAM at once, so they'd have to be reduced in quality to fit.

And yeah, the cow screen does use mode 3. So does the title screen and the level title screen, in fact. There's lots of games that use mode 3 for the purpose of displaying a high quality image, such as the first two games I showed off today.

Originally posted by Von Fahrenheit
I never know what to comment on your threads because there's so much going on, but know that I really enjoy them. A wise man named Albert Einstein, who was also President of the United States, once said: "Yoshifanatic's ASM Showoff is the sauce of the C3 meal" and I think that "damn, that guy really knew what he was talking about"

One day I'll figure out what to comment on these threads, but until then thank you for showing so much cool weird shit, I love it


I don't know how I manage it, but I keep finding new and interesting projects by each C3 since I started doing ASM threads (although unlike most other C3s, I planned this showing not long after the previous C3). XD Either way, I'm glad you enjoy them. ^_^

Originally posted by imamelia
Hey, Goof Troop. I actually kind of want to hack that. I personally find the layout of your disassemblies confusing, though.


That's neat. I'll be curious to see how that goes if you do hack GT.

Also, while it may be a bit confusing, my ROM framework is designed the way it is because I designed it to be really flexible while also giving the user the ability to affect output without editing the underlying disassembly. If a disassembly is set up the same way as the SMW one, then by using a custom ROM Map file, you can actually pick and choose exactly which routines/data of the base disassembly you use as well as their exact position. Not to mention that the routine macro system allows placing different parts of the same routine or a group of related routines next to one another for editing convenience.

That said, I updated the readme significantly for the release of these disassemblies, especially because the framework changed pretty majorly in the past few months. You definitely should give it a look if you haven't.

Originally posted by MarioFanGamer
Okay, you are really crazy, let's be honest.


I think by day 4, you'll probably wonder how I'm not in an asylum. XD

Originally posted by MarioFanGamer
It definitively shows that the SNES wasn't really weak, though it helps that the Mode 7 graphics is 8bpp linear so you don't need to perform complicated maths.


Yeah. To some, a 2.68 MHz processor is a crippling limitation. For others, it's a art form. The SNES manages to surprise me at times with how capable it can be even outside of what the official games do, like the sheer amount of resources I've fit into 4 MB with MYSQ or or the insane music ports that people make.

Originally posted by MarioFanGamer
The four I/O ports are the biggest bottlenecks of SNES audio, both in data transfer and passing data from CPU to SPC.
Either way, besides the idea of dynamic surround, I find it even more interesting that the developers handles surround in this game with two bytes of data instead of one.
And writing only few bytes of data per frame is a cool way to transition between two songs. I surely hope to see this once in a new AddmusicK version as it can be very helpful when you are able to preserve the star and p-switch timer and having only one local song loaded at a time severely limits that while also keeping the star and p-switch music in tact.


One of the motivating factors of doing these disassemblies wasn't just to for me to learn about games I've had as a kid, but to also expose a lot of the cool stuff these games do (especially from less popular games).

It'd be really cool to see some of the stuff I've brought up become major breakthroughs for the SMW hacking community or lead to really unique and interesting hacks. In addition to the audio stuff that could be implemented into AMK, imagine a SMW hack that has a mix of regular levels and JP first person shooter type levels? That would certainly get peoples' attention. XD

Originally posted by MarioFanGamer
I know this from byuu's old article which talks about emulator inaccuracy and how it affects the players and Jurassic Park was one of the many examples.


Same for me, even before I disassembled this game. For those curious, here is a link to that article.


Originally posted by MarioFanGamer
lol


It's actually kind of annoying, because I like some of this game's music and wouldn't mind having an .spc of it (particularly the normal Round game theme). This was one of the main reasons I chose to disassemble this game, in fact.

Originally posted by DeppySlide
I can't believe there's still two more days of releases in this thread! I've actually been reposting these in the discord for the Video Game History Foundation, since this definitely seems up their alley.


That's pretty neat. I hope they're able to find them useful!

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My Hacks:
Mario's Strange Quest V1.6
Yoshi's Inside Story (on hold)
Yoshi's Strange Quest V1.3 / V1.3.1 Beta 4.6 / Latest Test Build (Mario & Yoshi's Strange Quests)

Other stuff:
My SMW/SMAS/SMAS+W disassembly
Yoshifanatic's Discord Server: A place for fans of my stuff and/or Yoshi to chat with others.
Originally posted by yoshifanatic
As for guessing Goof Troop, I'm curious about what inspired that? Did you have Goof Troop growing up or have played it with someone?


Recently I was looking through all of the music tracks in YSQ when I came across one from Goof Troop. (I believe that track was used in the second half of S.S. Sunk.) Having never heard of Goof Troop before, I jumped to the conclusion that this was an obsucre title that you perhaps had a fondness for. Since it sounded like something on the weird side, I decided to guess that you would make a disassembly of it (although I had no idea that I would turn out to be correct).
That Jurassic Park game........ OMG

I had that game as a kid and all I remember doing was exploring, killing some dinos, picking up different guns, picking up some eggs and cards, entering some buildings and going into FPS mode and that was basically it. It was as if I didn't even think the game could be beat, but rather it was like one of those SIMS games or something. A game were you just explore until you get boarded with it. I swear that when this game first came out that probably very few people actual beat it. (the days before the internet).

All of those songs are stuck in my head too. Someone should make a hack and re-introduce the bone crushing sound when the T-rex gets you.
Wow, all this must have taken you a long time. Excellent work! I'm glad you disassembled Yoshi's Island. It's one of my favourite games too.

Originally posted by Yoshifanatic
I remember Naval Piranha gave me a lot of trouble as a kid, since my reading skills were weak and those 3 messages boxes explain how your eggs skid on water were lost on me. Also, I did not know about the Easter egg, though I did eventually discover it on my own.

I had the same problem as a child. The messages went over my head 😂Free counters!
Day 1
Day 2
Day 3
Day 4

With Day 3, two implications of my thread become obvious.
1). I've released so many disassemblies already.

2). That there is somehow still more to come.

If any of you were doubting whether or not I was still sane, then today should confirm I'm not. XD

(Also, I'm sorry that that SMW/SMAS/SMAS+W disassembly isn't up on GitHub yet. That one is proving to be really obnoxious to upload. It doesn't help that I made a mistake and couldn't figure out how to either delete a bunch of files at once, move a bunch of files at once, or "uncommit" a change. Also, I'll be replying to Minish Yoshi, Final Theory, and PsychoYoshi284's posts separately from this post).

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Super Mario RPG Disassembly
Github Link



Ok, everyone!! Here's the stumper. How do we eat this?


Supported ROMs (1)
- USA

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Mario Paint Disassembly
Github Link



The game some of you may have thought I was going to release yesterday. XD

Supported ROMs (1)
- USA/Japan

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Williams Arcade's Greatest Hits Disassembly
Github Link



I am Yoshifanatic. Beware cowards! I hunger. *Roaaaaaaaaraaahhhhh*!!!

Supported ROMs (1)
- USA

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Faceball 2000 Disassembly
Github Link



I hope all you guys are having a nice day! #tb{:)}

Supported ROMs (1)
- USA

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*The SMWCentral user is enraptured!*

Oh, you're interested in reading about SMRPG? That's good!

Regarding the technicals:
- This game uses the SA-1 chip, although its usage of it isn't particularly interesting from what I could tell. Nevertheless, maybe it'll help a bit with SA-1 research, as I'm not sure if there exists another full disassembly of this game (I wasn't able to find one).

- This game uses the HiROM mirror, which caused me no shortage of annoyance, since SHex assumes all SA-1 games use LoROM addressing and that the cartridge header is put in the middle of bank C0 rather than the end.

- This game has an interesting way of handling pointers. When the game loads an index, it reads the value of the first pointer's entry (whose position will always be immediately past the pointer table) and if the index reads past that, it subtracts that value from the index and increments the DBR. This means that various pointer tables are split across various banks.

- This game has a surprisingly small amount of normal code. A large chunk of this game is instead handled with scripting. The vast majority of this game's 4 MB is used by scripting, compressed graphics, samples, music, etc.

- The game's script makes usage of what I call "Text Macros", which help to shrink the size of the game's script by having certain bytes represent a string instead of a single letter. There are only a handful of these, such as "'s ", so most of the game's text is still readable in the Routine Macro file.

As for my personal experiences:
- This was my first RPG. Because of that, a lot of what I'm going to say regarding my personal experience with this game is going to sound like I was one of the worst players ever. XD
+ I got a used copy of this game with no manual, and my first experience with this game was messing around with the previous owner's saves. I remember the main save being at the point where you have to talk to the elder in Seaside Town to go to Land's End. This always affected how I'd view the earlier parts of the game when playing the game normally.
+ It took me a while to notice the "New Game" option on the file select screen and did not notice it until the old saves inevitably due to the temperamental nature of these games.
+ I have Asperger's Syndrome and can be very literal minded. You can image how well that went considering how this game uses quite a bit of sarcasm, accents, emphasis on words to imply a tone. In a way, this makes for a perfect test for how well someone like me can understand sarcasm, as nowadays, I have no trouble picking up on a lot of these subtleties.
+ On top of the above, my reading skills were a bit below par, so I'd occasionally misunderstand things.
+ I easily figured out that you need to double tap A/B to attack/defended, but somehow didn't pick up that I needed to do the same for X/Y to use special attacks/items for quite some time.
+ I needed my cousin's help to solve "puzzles" like breaking down the doors in Marrymore.

- Some boss fights that gave me trouble:
+ The Valentina boss due to the gimmick where your middle character has to fight solo for a while.
+ The Czar Dragon proved hard enough to the point where I needed my cousin's help to beat it.
+ The second Croco fight stopped me dead in my tracks once he steals your items because this was before I figured out how to use special attacks. Nowadays, this fight is trivial, since Croco only has single target attacks and Mallow has access to HP Rain.
+ Johnny also gave me trouble, since I didn't realize there were ways of avoiding the 1 on 1 duel portion of the fight.

- My primary team formation once I have access to all 5 characters is Mario, Geno, Bowser. However, I wouldn't always go with that combination.

- I have never gotten the Attack Scarf, let alone the Super Suit. I have gotten pretty much every other item however.

- Whenever I wanted to get the Beetle Mania game midway through the game, I'd usually leave the game running for half an hour while being in the room with the toad that sells it to you, since that's when the toad would offer the game. To this day, I still not sure what the requirements are to be given the option to buy this game or whether it's necessary to wait half an hour.

- I remember I once tried to justify the use of "cuz" instead of "because" in a school assignment because of this game. This was the only timed I did something like this.

- I've legitimately never seen the Samus cameo, though I have seen the Link cameo. I didn't understand the latter reference at first, since my first Zelda game was The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker, which I didn't play until years later.

- I remember when I was first messing around with computers and I had internet access, there was a site I liked that had lots of info on Super Mario RPG and Paper Mario. I don't remember what it was called or even if it's still around.

*The SMWCentral user has come to their senses!*

What, was it something I said? Is there something stuck in my teeth? What is it?

-----------------------------------------------

Give me a sec, there is a fly in my room. I need to kill it before I can talk about Mario Paint..... holy mackerel, what is this fly made of to be this durable?! Ugh, finally it's dead. Now, let's begin.

Regarding for the technicals:
- This game is essentially a tech demo for the SNES Mouse, so it naturally makes heavy usage of it, most of which is pretty obvious.

- A large chunk of the 1 MB ROM is taken up by uncompressed graphics.

- There are 5 demos in all if you wait long enough on the title screen without touching the mouse. No joke, the data for those demos take up nearly 3 ROM banks.

- This game makes heavy usage of stack relative addressing, and is a good demonstration of what can be done with it.

- Ever wonder why it takes so long to save? That's because the game actually compresses the data it saves. Not many SNES games do something like this.

- As this is a game about drawing, this game makes heavy usage of buffered graphics manipulation. Perhaps it could lead to some interesting graphical stuff for SMW hacks if it's figured out.

- This game is one of the smallest I've looked at in terms of how much code it uses. I think all of its non-SPC700 code could have fit in 2 banks.


As for my personal experience:
- I'd usually just mess around while playing this game. I doubt I ever used this to make anything "serious", especially considering I had no real way of showing of my creations even if I did. Think of how an 8 year old plays with action figures, and you'll get the idea of what I'd usually do.

- If you click on a falling star on the title screen, the music changes to a unique track and a bunch of sprites start raining down. I legitimately did not know about this until after I started working on my disassembly.

- I also never knew that this game had demos, since I never waited on the title screen long enough.

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Inspired by his never ending quest for progress in 2020, Yoshifanatic perfects the Yoshitrons: a robot species so advanced that little is superior to Yoshifanatic's own creation. Guided by their infallible logic, the Yoshitrons conclude:
YOSHIFANATIC IS KING OF C3, AND THEREFORE ALL WHO OPPOSE MUST BE DESTROYED.
You are the last hope for C3. Due to a genetic engineering error, you possess superhuman talents. Your mission is to stop the Yoshitrons, and save what remains of C3!


So, here is a compilation cart containing 5 classic arcade games, specifically:
Defender - One of the most important arcade games from the golden age of arcades, as it was one of the first horizontally scrolling shooters.
Defender II/Stargate - The same as Defender, but with some additional features and tweaks.
Joust - Another really popular game that inspired countless other games (ex. Nintendo's "Balloon Fight", which is mostly a clone of this game).
Robotron 2084 - This is the game that popularizes the idea of a twin stick control scheme that allows you to move and shoot in different directions.
Sinistar - A challenging space shooter that makes use of digitized voice clips for the antagonist.



Here are the technical details of this game:
- All 5 games on this cart are pretty much arcade perfect, aside from obvious differences with the controls. While nowadays, conversion ports like this aren't really necessary as emulation removes the need to do conversions, this is not a bad way to play these classic arcade games.

- Sinistar has all of his voice clips. They're all stored in the ARAM at once and the game handles them in a mad-libs style. The line I wrote below the download links should give an idea of what Sinistar will say (although obviously, he says "Sinistar", not "Yoshifanatic").

- This game makes use of mode 4 on the credits screen, which is one of the more uncommonly used modes.

- This game is coded in an unusual way, where it makes heavy usage of indirect indexing, 16-bit pseudo-indirect indexing (ie. LDA $0000,x), etc. It also makes use of parameter passing via stack relative addressing. It's actually kind of hard to identify what the code is doing a lot of the time.

- Each game has its own SPC engine, except for Defender II which shares its engine with Defender. The game loads the Defender SPC engine when first starting, but doesn't reload it when exiting a game that uses a different SPC engine. This might be why this is no audio at all outside of the games.

- Apparently, some versions of this compilation include a 6th game called "Bubbles". I couldn't find any evidence of this game on this cart, but with how messy the code organization is, I wouldn't be surprised if there are remnants of this game on the cart.

- I never knew this game had demos, probably because they take way too long to appear. It's only until I disassembled these games that I found out some of them had plots (like Robotron 2084, which I spoofed at the start of this section).



As for my personal experiences:
- I remember my Dad taking me to a nearby arcade to play arcade games. That's might be what led to me eventually getting this game, seeing as how this is a compilation of arcade games. I don't think I played these games in arcades, but two arcade games I do remember playing were that classic Simpsons Beat 'em up and Revolution X (if you're curious, no I don't have the abysmal SNES port of the latter).

- I find Sinistar's voice clips more funny than intimidating, but that might largely be because technology has advanced since this game was originally released.

- I don't have much else to add, other than that these are all arcade games I had fun playing.

-----------------------------------------------

Ever wished you could explore the cosmos? What about the city of Honolulu or your local bank? This game will surely scratch that itch.

This is the SNES port of an Atari ST game called "Midi Maze" that was ported to other systems, like the Gameboy and SNES. It's... a really weird game. XD

As for the technical stuff:
- Similar to Jurassic Park, this game makes use of a first person perspective. Unlike Jurassic Park, this game does it in a much different manner:
+ Mode 1 is used rather than Mode 7. The walls, items, objects, projectiles, and smiloids, use layer 1. The background uses layer 2. The HUD uses a combination of layer 3 and sprites.
+ The game makes use of double buffering to avoid screen tearing issues.
+ No custom chips are used.
It's less impressive compared to Jurassic Park's method of 3D rendering, but considering this came out earlier (and it does something JP doesn't do that makes it stand out), it's still pretty interesting. Here is a .gif of me playing the first level to demonstrate the 3D rendering:



- I'm not entirely sure how the game renders the smiloids, but the game definitely didn't pre-render the animation frames. There is some wizardry going on and I'd love to know what the game is doing. The smiloids are either some form of 3D models or the game is doing some trickery to simulate 3D models.

- This game is actually two games in one, as all the levels from the gameboy version are also included. You need a button combination to access these levels, which the game normally gives you after beating Cyberzone.

- This game does not make use of FastROM addressing, although turning it on doesn't seem to have much effect. At best, it felt like it shaved off 2 frames of input lag, but maybe I was imagining that.

- There seems to be quite a large number of unused multiplayer maps, none of which have a name.

- There are just enough 00s after the final boss's data to suggest a cut enemy.

- Similar to Jurassic Park, this game uploads a separate code block to the SPC700 that initializes the state of the SPC700, which then gets overwritten with the rest of the engine.

- When you get killed, the viewport image turns grey, the game displays the enemy that killed you facing towards the camera, what the enemy says (which is always [Enemy Name] Says: Have a nice day!), and a "Have a nice day!" voice clip plays. Said voice clip's pitch changes depending on the enemy, where stronger enemies have a deeper sounding voice than weaker ones.

- This game features 2 player split screen, meaning yes, it can render two different 3D views at the same time. The framerate does take a hit, but not enough to make the game annoying to play and it's still really impressive:



- You can pick which smiloid you play as and what name displays for your character. What you see in the above .gif is the default.



As for my personal experience with this game:
- I got this game alongside 4 other games (If I remember right: Mario is Missing, Mario's Early Years: Fun with Numbers, Acme Animation Factory, and Donkey Kong Country 2). These were some of the last SNES games I got as a kid and needless to say, only 2 of these 5 games are games I care about.

- This game has some really bizarre midi music. Have a listen. It'd certainly make for an interesting soundtrack if one were to port it to SMW. I like the City theme enough that I almost considered asking someone to port it so I could use it in YSQ. XD

- This game can be quite hard, but I have managed to beat it.

- This is one of the strangest games I own for any system, not just the SNES. Even as a kid, I thought it was weird. However, that just makes it all the more fascinating.

- Pro tip: In the Arena mode, do not play on "Feeding Pit" with the maximum amount of Bouncers present. That's what you do if you're a glutton for punishment.

-----------------------------------------------

*Gets tagged suddenly*



(Until Yoshifanatic respawns, you'll have to wait until tomorrow, where Yoshifanatic will show a game he likes that no one else seems to.)

Click here to continue to day 4

--------------------
My Hacks:
Mario's Strange Quest V1.6
Yoshi's Inside Story (on hold)
Yoshi's Strange Quest V1.3 / V1.3.1 Beta 4.6 / Latest Test Build (Mario & Yoshi's Strange Quests)

Other stuff:
My SMW/SMAS/SMAS+W disassembly
Yoshifanatic's Discord Server: A place for fans of my stuff and/or Yoshi to chat with others.
Originally posted by yoshifanatic
YOSHIFANATIC IS KING OF C3, AND THEREFORE ALL WHO OPPOSE MUST BE DESTROYED.

[grabs the controller] Time to play the game!

Maaaaan, looks like you're on a roll putting up some disassemblies of... SNES PORTS OF ARCADE GAMES! (Yes, including Sinistar.) Great job, dude! Keep up!
Reporting for you for this year’s E3. Catch it on 6:00 PM PHT.
And so the Courier who had cheated death in the cemetery outside Goodsprings cheated death once again, and the Mojave wasteland was forever changed.
“Even if you personally are so dissatisfied with life that you want the world to end, surely the cruel reality is that it will continue on, unchanging. All the better for someone perfectly content, like me.”
Aya Shameimaru, Touhou Suzunaan ~ Forbidden Scrollery
Dude you're killing it with these disassemblies. Also heck yeah for Wario's Woods SNES getting some love.
Originally posted by yoshifanatic
It's actually kind of annoying, because I like some of this game's music and wouldn't mind having an .spc of it (particularly the normal Round game theme). This was one of the main reasons I chose to disassemble this game, in fact.


Well, it does exist an SNSF rip though, which works similarly to the PSF file by Neill Corlett. I suppose for games which use the S-SMP in uncommon ways, this approach is one capable of obtaining playable files!

I'm really loving to read all the stuff you put up here! That's an amazing job you've been doing!
Wow, I wasn't expecting you to disassemble the Arcade's Greatest Hits game. I think it's relatively obscure. I also happen to have it as a SNES cartridge.

Speaking of that game, how big is the ROM and what type of mapping does it use?

Originally posted by yoshifanatic regarding Mario Paint
As this is a game about drawing, this game makes heavy usage of buffered graphics manipulation.

What is that? It sounds powerful. I've always wondered how drawing would work on a system with tilemapped graphics. Bitmapped graphics are good for drawing, and the SNES can't really do bitmapped graphics. The Game Boy Advance can, though.

Click the character on the right side of my layout to visit my Discord server and discuss and play and look at and get updates and sneak peeks of the games and other things I'm making.

The authors of these 2 My Little Pony fan games have removed their games from the Internet.
Rise of the Clockwork Stallions has been updated! Download My Little Pony: Rise of the Clockwork Stallions DX: Director's Cut and My Little Pony: Magic Shards now! Spread this link!

Super Mario RPG Disassembly. Super Mario RPG Disassembly? Super Mario RPG Disassembly!

I'm not sure why this is so inspiring to see but I want to poke at it and see what happens. Time to whip out the old notepad, we're going deep boys #smrpg{:O}

allow shy guy emojis in post footers you cowards!
Originally posted by Minish Yoshi
Recently I was looking through all of the music tracks in YSQ when I came across one from Goof Troop. (I believe that track was used in the second half of S.S. Sunk.) Having never heard of Goof Troop before, I jumped to the conclusion that this was an obsucre title that you perhaps had a fondness for. Since it sounded like something on the weird side, I decided to guess that you would make a disassembly of it (although I had no idea that I would turn out to be correct).


You'd be correct in that case (and in the case of a couple other unusual games that I used a song from, such as Jurassic Park). However, a good chunk of the random games I used a song from are simply because I heard that port in someone else's hack and wanted to use it myself. For example, I've never played Cave Story, Jazz Jackrabbit, Gradius Rebirth, Mega Man 2, and more.

Originally posted by Final Theory
That Jurassic Park game........ OMG

I had that game as a kid and all I remember doing was exploring, killing some dinos, picking up different guns, picking up some eggs and cards, entering some buildings and going into FPS mode and that was basically it. It was as if I didn't even think the game could be beat, but rather it was like one of those SIMS games or something. A game were you just explore until you get boarded with it. I swear that when this game first came out that probably very few people actual beat it. (the days before the internet).

All of those songs are stuck in my head too. Someone should make a hack and re-introduce the bone crushing sound when the T-rex gets you.


I don't think I beat this game either until I was able to look up the solution. And it's not just the case of me not knowing I could push a box. You need to pick up all the eggs to be able to beat the game, but one of the eggs requires you to walk through trees to find. There is also the fact that only specific computer terminals allow you to successfully give yourself security clearance or communicate with the boat/mainland. These cryptic elements are one of the bigger flaws with this game.

Also, I tried to figure out how to get the sound to play in that situation, but I wasn't able to. I did mess around with the streamed samples though, and I got the T-Rex to use Ian Malcolm's "Grant!" voice clip.

Originally posted by PsychoYoshi284
Wow, all this must have taken you a long time. Excellent work! I'm glad you disassembled Yoshi's Island. It's one of my favourite games too.


It did. YI took me the longest to do out of all these disassemblies. You'd think SMRPG would take longer because that's twice the size of YI, but YI was a lot more complicated and had far more code to deal with.

Originally posted by PsychoYoshi284
I had the same problem as a child. The messages went over my head 😂


Good to know I wasn't the only one who had the same problem. XD

Originally posted by Klug
[grabs the controller] Time to play the game!

Maaaaan, looks like you're on a roll putting up some disassemblies of... SNES PORTS OF ARCADE GAMES! (Yes, including Sinistar.) Great job, dude! Keep up!


It's pretty nice that I was able to get a good variety of different games disassembled. Arcade ports, licensed titles, first party games, popular games, obscure games, etc. I'm glad to see people appreciating the fact I did some of these more obscure SNES games.

Originally posted by Moltz
Dude you're killing it with these disassemblies. Also heck yeah for Wario's Woods SNES getting some love.


Regarding Wario's Woods, I actually didn't plan on doing that initially. However, I'm glad I did. There is quite a lot of interesting stuff in some of these games I may have otherwise skipped if I stuck to my initial plans.

Originally posted by NTI Productions

Well, it does exist an SNSF rip though, which works similarly to the PSF file by Neill Corlett. I suppose for games which use the S-SMP in uncommon ways, this approach is one capable of obtaining playable files!

I'm really loving to read all the stuff you put up here! That's an amazing job you've been doing!


I see. However, I simply just downloaded a Youtube video of the music. It's not ideal, but it's good enough for me.

Also, I'm glad you enjoyed all the stuff I've said about these games!

Originally posted by DPBOX
Wow, I wasn't expecting you to disassemble the Arcade's Greatest Hits game. I think it's relatively obscure. I also happen to have it as a SNES cartridge.

Speaking of that game, how big is the ROM and what type of mapping does it use?


You do? That's neat! Also, I don't think the actual arcade games on this cart are obscure, but this compilation cart most likely is.

Also, it's 512 KB and uses LoROM (FastROM) mapping.

Originally posted by DPBOX
What is that? It sounds powerful. I've always wondered how drawing would work on a system with tilemapped graphics. Bitmapped graphics are good for drawing, and the SNES can't really do bitmapped graphics. The Game Boy Advance can, though.


Basically, it's whenever you put graphics in RAM, and modify them there to create new graphics tiles. You've used buffered graphics manipulation whenever you used the VWF Dialogues patch, as the patch puts the letter graphics in RAM first to create new tiles where the letters are closer together. It's the same idea with Mario Paint, except in this case, it's to handle the changes the user makes to the canvas.

Also, the SNES can do bitmapped graphics through mode 7 (as seen in Jurassic Park), but that would shrink the resolution of the image to 128x128. The Mario Paint programmers opted for a larger canvas, so that's why it doesn't use mode 7.

Originally posted by Von Fahrenheit
Super Mario RPG Disassembly. Super Mario RPG Disassembly? Super Mario RPG Disassembly!

I'm not sure why this is so inspiring to see but I want to poke at it and see what happens. Time to whip out the old notepad, we're going deep boys #smrpg{:O}


If you do, this will likely be very useful. That's the closest thing to a disassembly I was able to find of SMRPG, where it's more just a collection of useful documentation than an actual disassembly. I didn't have the time to document a good deal of stuff in my SMRPG disassembly, so those documents should help a lot.

Incidentally, while I didn't poke super deep into this game, I did mess around with it a bit. My favorite thing I did being this, where toad has some... interesting ideas for how to teach Mario timed hits.



--------------------
My Hacks:
Mario's Strange Quest V1.6
Yoshi's Inside Story (on hold)
Yoshi's Strange Quest V1.3 / V1.3.1 Beta 4.6 / Latest Test Build (Mario & Yoshi's Strange Quests)

Other stuff:
My SMW/SMAS/SMAS+W disassembly
Yoshifanatic's Discord Server: A place for fans of my stuff and/or Yoshi to chat with others.
With Day 4, my insanity level finally reaches its peak. Or at least you'd think that, but since I'm full of surprises, I'm going to let someone decide a game I should disassemble next.

How? Well, for those of you on my Discord server, you know those posts where I mentioned I was working on my "secret project"? Each time I used that phrase in a post on my server, each of those posts marked when I officially considered a disassembly complete (except the first post where I announced the project, because I was dumb). Even if I was talking about something else, I worked a reference to the game into each of those posts. So, to decide which game I'll disassemble next, I want someone to figure out the order I finished the disassemblies based on these posts.

For those not on my server, here are all the relevant posts so you can participate too.

Notes:
- If the puzzle is not solved by the 21st of January, then whoever got the most amount of correct answers will be the winner.
- SMW, SMAS, SMAS+W, Plok, and EarthBound are not part of puzzle.
- The game you pick must be an officially released SNES game (ie. no hacks, no bootlegs, no homebrew, no competition/promotional carts, no prototypes, etc.)
- The game can't be a different version of a game I already disassembled (ex. YI USA V1.1)
- The game can't be one I've partially disassembled (only applies to EarthBound)
- I'd prefer to do a game that's in English, but it's not necessary
- Submit your answer via a PM or DMing me on Discord, whichever you prefer.
- If there is somehow a tie and multiple people submit the correct answer at the same time, each person will chose a game, and I'll pick a game from the choices I'm given.

This way, if there was that one game you wished I disassembled, but didn't, now you have a chance of getting me to do it.

(Oh, also, before I forget, the SMW/SMAS/SMAS+W disassembly is up on GitHub now).

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Pac-Man 2 The New Adventures Disassembly
Github Link



I've got 4 words for you. The Pac is..... somewhere. Probably out grocery shopping, I think.

Supported ROMs (1)
- USA

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EarthBound Disassembly
Github Link



The mother of all stinky RPGs.

Supported ROMs (1)
- (Incomplete) USA

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Super Mario Kart Disassembly
Github Link



Toad: Yahoo! I'm the best! *Slips on banana peel* Ahhhh!
Yoshi: *cheering Yoshi noise*


Supported ROMs (2 total)
- USA
- USA (Rev.1)

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Frogger Disassembly
Github Link



Why are there tire marks on this cartridge? Was it trying to cross the road again?!

Supported ROMs (1)
- USA

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SNES ROM Framework
Github Link


What made all this possible.

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(I edited the ROM to make this .gif. The game normally says "You need more cartridges").
Also, this seems like it would be a great meme format. Just replace the Ms. Pac-Man title screen with something else. That way, Pac-Man can get sad over something more ridiculous than seeing a childish insult about him in a video game. XD


So, about the game I like that nobody else seems to like (well, aside from maybe my brothers), it's Pac-Man 2! While this isn't necessarily my favorite game, this is a game I feel like people either don't give a chance to, or they miss something small and make the game more frustrating than it otherwise would be. As someone who grew up with it and likes this game, perhaps I might be able to change a few minds?

If you decide to give this a look, I implore you to treat it like a sandbox game. This is not a sequel to the original arcade Pac-Man like the title might mislead you into thinking it is (although a certain other game I talked about used the same tactic, although that case is less questionable than PM2's case). It was billed as an "Interactive Cartoon" for a reason, where I feel the real enjoyment comes from creating your own narrative for why things are playing out the way they are and experimenting with how the world and/or Pac-Man reacts to your input. This game is not very satisfying to play if going under the expectation of "beating it", because it's short and easy even if you don't know what you're doing. Think of it like you would a game like "Hey, You Pikachu!" (which, funnily enough, PM2 was called "Hello! Pac-Man" in Japan, which is not only a similar name to HYP, but it helps back up my point about the questionable title).

A couple tips:
- If Pac-Man's near constant movement is annoying you, all you need to do is hold Y, then press a D-pad direction (particularly in the opposite direction he's moving because certain moods will cause him to not respond to looking up/down/forward) to get Pac-Man to temporarily stop.

- You can also shoot him with your slingshot to stop him, though that may alter his mood.

- Pac-Man's mood affects how he interacts with things, so it pays to experiment.



As for the technicals:
- This game includes both the original Pac-Man and Ms. Pac-Man as a bonus. By disassembling this game, I also disassembled these two games. If this disassembly ever gets far enough along to allow it, I'll consider making a standalone version of these ports.

- The attention to detail is very high, as not only are they quite a lot of things in the world that react to your shots, but Pac-Man has a wide range of different reactions to things based on his current mood. You can tell a lot of passion was put into this and the devs were having fun creating all the different reactions Pac-Man has. Here are just a few examples of things that can happen if you mess around:




- This is a FastROM game, but this game certainly likes to go in and out of FastROM addressing for some reason. This game doesn't suffer from slowdown at least, but it's still odd. Even odder, the arcade ports intentionally turn off FastROM addressing.

- Pac-Man has a "voice" in this game. He doesn't speak in any coherent words, but he's got a lot of different grunts, sighs, yells, and other assorted vocal sounds. It's another charming element of this game.

- Pac-Man has an absolutely crazy amount of poses and a wide range of different moods he can be in. It's probably not an exaggeration to say Pac-Man is one of the most expressive characters from any game on the SNES. Pac-Man has moods for varying levels of happiness, sadness, and anger, and he can also be scared, depressed, or even insane. I wasn't able to figure out how this is controlled, however.

- This game has an interesting soundtrack. It's fairly heavy on musical stings for certain events, but this game does have normal music.


As for my personal experiences:
- I start off every playthrough by shooting Pac-Man's mailbox to open it until he gets frustrated from me opening it repeatedly. I like to pretend that, when he slams the cover, he slams it so hard that it falls open on its own.

- This game is a lot of fun to mess around with, not just from all the slapstick, but from coming up with my own story for why things are happening the way they are. For example:
+ The cat is jealous that Pac-Man bought a hotdog, so it attacks Pac-Man.
+ A paper warning sign keeps folding over and Pac-Man insists on straightening it out. When he gets annoyed, he tries to knock on the nearby door to tell the neighbor about it, but as soon as Pac-Man walks away... BAM!!! The neighbor slams the door into Pac-Man, flattening him into a pancake. At least the door slamming caused the paper sign to straighten out... then it folds over one last time to add salt to the wound.
+ After messing with a guy painting a billboard causes Pac-Man to end up catapulted into the air, the force of Pac-Man landing causes the head of a nearby burger restaurant display to fly off. When Pac-Man comes to, he freaks out and instead of putting the head back on, he gets behind the display and pretends to be the head right as the shop owner comes out to inspect the noise he heard. Pac-Man then attempts to keep up this charade each time he senses the shop owner is coming, but then the shop owner eventually comes out without warning and is furious.
+ Pac-Man was riding around in a minecart, when suddenly a big spider landed on his head. This caused Pac-Man to freak out by jumping several feet out of the minecart. He then proceeds to bang his head on a stalactite, which causes Blinky to show up and mock him.

- I have beaten this game before, yet I don't remember that one weird screen in the ending with the Chinese(?) text on it. I'll have to play through my physical copy of this game to see if it really is supposed to be there. Perhaps the fact I don't play this game to beat it is why I have this gap in my memory?

- This game was actually kind of annoying to disassemble because of the heavy use of jump tables, constant A/X/Y size changing, and the programmers' love of RLE compressed files. If I hadn't disassembled this game, I wonder if anyone else would have even bothered?

- I prefer playing on level 3, as that one gives you access to the most amount of stuff to play around with.

-----------------------------------------------

I asked Orange Kid to help me out with this disassembly. However, I kicked him off the project when the tool he made somehow caused my laptop to fall apart when I executed the tool. I would have asked Apple Kid, but he seemed to be busy working on some sort of weird yogurt machine, I think.

The Earthbound disassembly is technically not part of this project, but since I did work on it I'm going to release a new version.
In this updated version of the disassembly, you can now get to the point where you first gain control of Ness, but can't do much after that point. Previously, you could get up to the title screen.

As for the technicals, I can't elaborate on a lot of things because the disassembly is incomplete, but there are some interesting things I did uncover:
- The way the code is written highly suggests this game was written in a higher level programming language. There is no way this was written in ASM (although Satoru Iwata was a genius programmer, so I wouldn't be shocked if he did).

- This game heavily uses the direct page register as an index, as it adds/subtracts from it at the start of many routines.

- The game's script makes heavy usage of what I call "Text Macros", which I explained when talking about Super Mario RPG. However, this game uses these to such a heavy degree, that I can't see anyone editing much of the text without the use of a tool tot handle this. For example, the "*No problem here." string is represented like this: "*No" " pro" "ble" "m" " here.", where each of those quotes except the single m are text macros.

- The game saves the instant before you first gain control of Ness.

- You know that red static that appears on the War On Giygas screen? That's literally Giygas, as this screen loads the Giygas BG then heavily distorts it to create static.

- When naming Ness's dog, there is a sprite tile drawn behind King that is a bunch of Zzz. This is not used.




As for my personal experiences:
- Despite what you might think, I never had this game growing up. In fact, I didn't play it or have much exposure to it (aside from a couple mentions of it from Nintendo Power) until 2018. Anything that seems like it may be an EB reference in MSQ/YSQ is a coincidence.

- Despite the fact that it originally came with a strategy guide, I was able to get through the game with no outside help. .... until literally the last action I needed to do to beat the final boss. The game basically tricks you into thinking praying will have no effect after a certain point, hence why I got stuck.

- I found a lot of the stuff surrounding this game fascinating. A particular highlight was learning about its localization, from the guy who created the excellent Mother 3 translation (and yes, I also got the book mentioned throughout that comparison).

- Yes, I found the limited inventory annoying, although I was able to adapt to it.

- Do I need to say that I really liked the humor in this game?

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*Driving along* Huh? What's that sound? *Looks in rear-view mirror* OH FUDGE...... *Kaboom*!! Oh no, don't tumble that way! *falls down hole* Darn it, now I'm in 2nd place! *Lightning strike* Come on! *a red shell hits me* GAHH!! *banana peel is thrown directly in front of and behind me* *has a mental breakdown*

Oh, also, with this disassembly release, all 5 of the major SNES Mario games have been disassembled by me and are using the same framework! Every one of the games I've disassembled has access to the same array of options, whether a game uses them or not. Every one is built using asar. Every one has the same method of applying .asm patches during assembly. And so on. The 2020s are going to have some absolutely insane ROM hacks if people make use of these disassemblies and contribute to documenting/standardizing as much stuff in these games as possible.

Anyway, regarding Super Mario Kart's technical details:
- This game makes use of the DSP-1 chip. However, this isn't particularly interesting, as it's just a black box chip that you feed commands to and it spits out data. It's basically like the multiplication/division registers on the SNES, but you have access to a lot more types of math calculations.

- This games makes use of mode 0 for displaying the small scrolling backgrounds and part of the HUD. If I remember correctly, the rendering mode switching in order to make the track use mode 7 is handled via HDMA.

- This game makes heavy use of 16-bit indexing and is one of the games that taught me how powerful that is. Here is why:
+ You can index all 8 KB of the RAM mirror and all hardware registers with DP addressing, since DP addressing assumes you're in bank 00 regardless of the Data Bank Register.
+ You can index anywhere in the ROM with absolute addressing, with the DBR acting as the bank byte. Alternatively, if the DBR can't be changed, you can use long addressing to be able to read from any address in a specific bank.
+ JSR.w ($0000,x)/JMP.w ($0000,x) can jump anywhere in the current bank, based on what ROM address is being read from.
+ You can index tables larger than 256 bytes.

- This game is a HiROM game, yet it behaves more like a LoROM game. Essentially, the lower halves of banks are mapped to $C0-$C7, while the upper halves are mapped to $80-$87.

- There were two USA versions of this game, one that uses the DSP-1 chip and one that uses the DSP-1B chip. These ROMs are 100% identical to each other, so adding support for it was as simple as copy/pasting the ROM Map file and changing one define.

- There are quite a few references to bank 08 in the code, even though there is no bank 08 in the ROM.


As for my personal experiences:
- As a kid, I found this game incredibly frustrating, to the point where I hated this game. I did manage to unlock the 150cc class, but I don't think I ever managed to get a gold trophy in all of the cups.

- I never knew this until I disassembled this game, but there are supports under the track in the ghost valley stages.

- As a kid, I didn't care too much who I'd play as, but nowadays, I'll almost always pick Yoshi. That applies to the rest of the series as well.

- My mom has mentioned that I used to hit myself in frustration when playing video games as a kid. Considering how much the AI cheats in this game and how on very rare occasions I can get angry enough to do this, I can believe that. Fun fact: it's not uncommon for people with Asperger's Syndrome to throw tantrums when angry, particularly when they're in an uncomfortable situation or a situation where they have no control.

- While I don't like this game too much gameplay wise, I do really like the music. Also, it didn't stop me from checking out the sequels (I considered the DS version the least frustrating and Wii the most).

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So, I bet you guys are feeling a strong sense of happy happy, joy joy in hearing me talk about what I consider the best SNES game ever made? Well, I was going to write a big, long essay about how amazing this game is. But, all you really need to know is that this game's awesomesauce level is over 9000! What? Don't look at me like that. I put more effort into that joke than some official Frogger ports, I'll have you know. If you want to experience real cringe, imagine someone buying a lazily made Frogger port at full price. *shudders* Or worse, imagine someone spending time disassembling said port! *gags*

Anyway, let's talk about an amazing Frogger port for the SNES and why it's an underrated gem!

Regarding the technical stuff:
- This game has some of the most beautiful music ever to come out of the SNES. Have a listen. It's not's as catchy as the original arcade Frogger's music, but you can tell a lot of passion was put into this soundtrack.

- All the game's graphics are stored uncompressed. For some odd reason, the sprite graphics are duplicated.

- This game has some amazing looking visu.....*bursts out laughing*


(To be fair, I think the hand-drawn illustrations look neat, but you're not exactly going to be looking at those for much of the gameplay).

- This game has a ton of sound effects to perfectly accentuate the action on screen. When I counted how many there were, I was holding up FIVE. WHOLE. FINGERS!! Wow! I didn't know they made numbers that big!

- It was one of the last games to officially release on the SNES, in 1998. They say you should always go out with a bang. I guess you could consider a post-mortem fart as a bang in a way.

- This game was only released in the USA, because effort costs money.

- The SPC engine is divided up into small pieces much like Earthworm Jim 2's engine, because that was a more important usage of the programmers' time than making the game more fun.

- This game allows you to tweak various .... no wait, this game has no customization options aside from a basic two player mode. Sorry to get your hopes up.

- Surely, there must be more to this game than just Frogger, right? Williams Arcade's Greatest Hits came out 2 years prior and that had 5 games, so surely this must..... nope. Just Frogger.

- This game is 512 KB, yet it has less to offer than the SNES Ms. Pac-Man port, which is a 256 KB game. And that port had several customization options! Also, WAGH was 512 KB itself!

- I disassembled this entire game within a day. I probably put more effort into this disassembly than the programmers did making this port! O_o

- This game apparently has re-used audio assets and audio leftovers from "The Ren & Stimpy Show: Buckeroo$" of all things.



Regarding my personal experiences:
- This game gave me lots of fun. The cartridge allowed me to put a bit of weight on the SNES's AV cables to stabilize the image and allowed me to be able to play my other games!

- I disassembled this game because I wanted to see how much nothing was on the cart. Inside the cart was absolutely nothing, and so much nothing came bursting out when I looked inside. In a literal sense, you could say that's not true because the cart had code, graphics, audio data, and other stuff on it, but the sum of its parts somehow adds up to negative numbers, so it might as well be a blank cartridge.

- *Stares off into space* Huh? You say something?

- Do you really think I played this game a lot as a kid? When the best thing I can say about it is that it was useful for holding down AV cables, that doesn't exactly scream "must play".

- ..... Sorry, I spaced out again. What was I talking about again? Oh right, we were talking about the SNES ROM framework!

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So, the last thing I'll be showcasing is the standalone version of the framework that all these disassemblies are built off of. It started off only being designed for SMW, but I've added new features and functionality that enables it to work with lots of different ROM configurations. From the games I've disassembled, this framework handles:
- SA-1, SuperFX, DSP-1 games
- SNES Mouse games
- LoROM, HiROM (FastROM), LoROM (FastROM), SA-1 (HiROM), SuperFX (LoROM/HiROM) games.
- Games that use the expanded cartridge header
- ROMs of various sizes from 512 KB to 4 MB

However, it also supports, even if only partially, a lot of other stuff that these games don't use, such as every known official chip, the MSU-1, every known peripheral, ROMs larger than 4 MB or smaller than 512 KB, the Super Gameboy, the Satelleview, etc. I included these things in case I or someone else wanted to use this framework to make new disassemblies, and having support for the more obscure stuff means that the actual framework itself won't need to change much, just the configuration files for these specific things.

In addition, while the other disassemblies include the framework files, readme, and changelog, this download comes with some extras:
- A "GAMEX" disassembly, which is a shell disassembly that acts as the base for a new disassembly or homebrew project.
- 3 Asar scripts that can disassemble a large block of SNES/SPC700/SuperFX code when applied to a ROM. They're meant to be used in conjunction with SHex, as both have functions the other one lacks.
- A batch script that extracts a sample bank.
- An asar script that sets up a sample bank pointer table and data.

Those code disassembly scripts were absolutely essential to me being able to disassemble 12 games in 4-5 months. Without those, I probably would have done half as many disassemblies. I couldn't afford to wait for p4plus2 to fix the issues I reported about SHex, so I decided to take matters into my own hands and write some scripts that would compensate for the problems SHex has. I still needed SHex for some things (ex. My script only generates labels after opcodes that the CPU can't pass through, something SHex doesn't do unless an opcode points to those locations), but these scripts saved me a lot of time. Also, potential wrist strain. Can't forget about that. XD SHex really should have an option to insert the opcode length specifiers because that alone was enough to justify making these scripts.

Lastly, while not exclusive to this standalone download, I rewrote the readme significantly. Now, it's very detailed to explain not only how to utilize the features of my disassembly, but also some tangential topics, like making your own disassembly.

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And that's pretty much it. This was a ton of work to disassemble all these games, and I hope you guys enjoyed this 4 day journey! :)



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My Hacks:
Mario's Strange Quest V1.6
Yoshi's Inside Story (on hold)
Yoshi's Strange Quest V1.3 / V1.3.1 Beta 4.6 / Latest Test Build (Mario & Yoshi's Strange Quests)

Other stuff:
My SMW/SMAS/SMAS+W disassembly
Yoshifanatic's Discord Server: A place for fans of my stuff and/or Yoshi to chat with others.
Fun fact: Frogger actually uses Ren and Stimpy: Buckeroo$'s sound data.
Pages: « 1 2 3 » Link
Forum Index - Sunken Ghost Ship - C3 Museum - Winter 2021 - Yoshifanatic's ASM Showoff: Part 11 (Day 4)

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