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What do you think about Windows 11 leaks? (Windows 11 was finally revealed)
Forum Index - Donut Plains - Computers & Technology - What do you think about Windows 11 leaks? (Windows 11 was finally revealed)
Pages: « 1 2 » Link
I actually kinda like simplistic logos. I guess that's a somewhat unpopular opinion, but there we go.

The only thing that's somewhat bothering me about the Windows 11 logo is that it has sharp corners, which is in no way reflective of the actual OS. I think they should have given the logo round corners, kinda like the Windows 1.0 logo. That's really a nitpick, though.

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Feel free to visit my website/blog - it's updated rarely, but it looks pretty cool!
Oh, yeah, about the logos: The trend for flat design indeed gets applied too blindly and many logos surely end up being too bland (four squares in a single colour? Come on, it can't get any more bland than that!) but the same can't be said for Firefox given its colours and still having a relatively complex shape.

Originally posted by Klug
Like I said in this thread, it seems that Windows 10 is about to end in four years or less, so people might need to switch to the latest version when it's released. Also, the devs at Wine would have a hard time to make Windows 11 apps work on other Linux distros!

Where... are you going with that response, considering it doesn't really match up with my quoted post and reads confusingly as well?
Originally posted by Klug

Like I said in this thread, it seems that Windows 10 is about to end in four years or less, so people might need to switch to the latest version when it's released.


well four years to some people seems like a long time

maybe in 2025 I'll just get a brand new PC with a pre-installed Win11 version from that time. no need for me to switch to Win11 in late 2021 since the first release of that will have some bugs to be ironed out which will eventually get fixed in future feature updates for Win11

in the meantime, I'm happy running Win10 LTSC 2019, which has a much different support timeline and will be supported beyond 2025
Well, well, well! We now have an official release date for Windows 11: The next-gen OS will be released on October 5th as a free upgrade, so stay tuned for that!

Also, if you're planning to upgrade your PC to Windows 11 from an older version Windows, make sure that your PC is eligible for the upgrade. "The upgrade will then roll out over time to in-market devices based on intelligence models that consider hardware eligibility, reliability metrics, age of device and other factors that impact the upgrade experience," as stated in this article from the Windows Experience Blog.

Therefore, everyone should get a free upgrade to Windows 11 by mid-2022!
Major thanks to Nenilein (a.k.a. @PinkGeekNeni on Twitter) for the profile pic I'm using!
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Do note that Windows 11 will force you to have a 64-bit capable computer, which makes perfect sense in today's day and age, but will also "force" you to have TPM 2.0 and SecureBoot enabled on your UEFI config.

However, for those who like to dual-boot, or don't want to upgrade to an officially supported device to run Windows 11, you don't have to. Windows 11 runs just fine without TPM or SecureBoot, you just need to tinker the installer to trick it into installing anyway. After that, Windows will apparently run just fine, even on a computer that still uses a BIOS instead of UEFI.

A good ol' Linus Tech Tips video has more info and a tutorial on how to bypass the minimum requirements. The solutions include either editing specific registry keys, or swapping files between the Windows 11 installer and the Windows 10 one. It also includes some potential explanations about why Microsoft has these requirements in the first place.

I'll likely do a fresh install of Windows 11 on a small SSD and use one of the Windows 10 Education keys my college has allocated to me on it. I use Windows a few times a year and I don't need it around for anything other than some software and a couple of games that refuse to run under Linux (natively or with Wine/Proton).
Originally posted by erpster2


Ayyy, nice. Well, now that it’s out…

Mods, I suppose you could close this thread :)


From what I've seen of Windows 11 it seems like Microsoft is trying to be like Apple.

They've changed the location of the taskbar from the usual bottom left of the screen to the middle of the screen which just looks weird. And the power button is no longer in a Start location, it's in some settings window.

After seeing what Windows 11 seems to be like, I'm honestly okay with the fact that my computer doesn't seem to be compatible with the upgrade. I don't think I'd want it anyways.
Originally posted by RanAS
I'll likely do a fresh install of Windows 11 on a small SSD and use one of the Windows 10 Education keys my college has allocated to me on it.

I have done just that and it's working well, though I barely use it. No real complaints so far. Though I did notice how my browser's user agent string still has "(Windows NT 10.0; Win64; x64)" in it, even on Windows 11.

Going back to the minimum requirments ordeal, I was wondering, well why do I need a supported CPU if all the safety features that Microsoft has put into Windows 11 don't need it? Well, turns out, they're trying something called HVCI or Memory Integrity (which is also present in Windows 10 for the computers that support it) which seems to be the issue:

Originally posted by ArsTechnica
Windows 11 (and also Windows 10!) uses virtualization-based security, or VBS, to isolate parts of system memory from the rest of the system. VBS includes an optional feature called "memory integrity." That's the more user-friendly name for something called Hypervisor-protected code integrity, or HVCI. HVCI can be enabled on any Windows 10 PC that doesn't have driver incompatibility issues, but older computers will incur a significant performance penalty because their processors don't support mode-based execution control, or MBEC.

And that acronym seems to be at the root of Windows 11's CPU support list. If it supports MBEC, generally, it's in. If it doesn't, it's out. MBEC support is only included in relatively new processors, starting with the Kaby Lake and Skylake-X architectures on Intel's side, and the Zen 2 architecture on AMD's side—this matches pretty closely, albeit not exactly, with the Windows 11 processor support lists.

Even a video Microsoft posted in one of their channels clarifies what's going on with these requirements. My CPU is an Intel Core i5-6600, which puts it exactly one generation behind support for MBEC, but two generations behind Microsoft's offical "support list".

Even so, there's a few reports that even with CPUs that support MBEC, Windows 11 still carries a noticeable performance penalty compared to Windows 10. I just wonder if they're gonna make any benchmarks with CPUs that don't support MBEC so that they can measure how important having a supported CPU really is, that'd be neat to see.
This processor incompatibility is why I couldn't switch to Windows 11 even if I wanted. I have an i7-5960x, which is only like 7-ish years old and at the time was a high-end CPU. Even today, it's still incredibly capable in my opinion (8 cores/16 threads).

That being said, until Windows 11 brings back the ability to ungroup and expand tasks on the task bar, I have no intention of switching, anyways. This is incredibly essential to my work flow. I like being able to know what a task is at a single glance and being able to get everywhere with a single click. Grouping of tasks and missing names always just makes me go searching for stuff, which throws me out of the flow every time. These are simply features I can't do without.

Honestly, the only feature of Windows 11 that's even remotely interesting for me at this time is the Android emulator, and that's only because I don't have WiFi at home, so I can't use internet on my phone.

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Feel free to visit my website/blog - it's updated rarely, but it looks pretty cool!
though there are ways to install Win11 on unsupported CPUs and on older PCs without TPM like this article mentioned by The Verge

but I think Win11 was released a little too prematurely in early Oct. 2021 as there are still some bugs to flush out, like this performance problem with certain SSD drives mentioned by WindowsLatest.


better to wait until at least early 2022 to install Windows 11 as those problems may get fixed by then.
Originally posted by Klug
Well, well, well, friends. Windows 11 has been finally revealed, and there's a lot of new features to try it out for you (but you might check your PC's settings first!). Here's the list:
  • A redesigned Start Menu. This one here is much more simple than the one used in Windows 8 and 10. Also: RIP, Live Tiles.
  • You can manage windows easily thanks to Snap Layouts. It makes decision making much easier than ever before!
  • Say hello to Windows Widgets! A far cry to Gadgets used in Windows Vista and 7, this mini-tools can personalize your PC for a different look. Built-in Widgets include News & Interests, Windows Weather and Windows Maps. As a bonus, it also includes one that lets you tip local creators from within Windows 11.
  • Touch gestures, another big game-changer for Windows 11, improve the functionality for tablets and touchscreens: Instead of switching to Tablet Mode, the OS simply adapts to allow you to touch everything on-screen.
    (Does this mean we can play Senran Kagura on Windows 11? Sign us up!)
    Other improvements include support for haptic feedback and improvements to inking and voice typing.
  • Windows 11 is specially designed for gaming! Combined with the powers of Xbox Game Pass, you can play games in blazing fast speeds and clearer graphics, thanks to the new feature from Xbox Series X/S—DirectSorage! (Note that DirectStorage may require the latest NVMe drives to speed up game load times on Windows 11, and game developers will need to enable this technology to boost load times further.) And oh, you can also stream games via xCloud (included in the Xbox App!), too.
  • It runs Android apps. With greater help from Amazon and Intel, Microsoft is giving Windows 11 the true ultimate power to make this one a reality thanks to the powers of Intel Bridge technology. This beats BlueStacks' sissy butts and send them to the giant flaming dumpster! (But please, don't take them literally.)

And without further ado, here are the minimum system requirements for this upcoming operating system:
  • Processor: 1 gigahertz (GHz) or faster with 2 or more cores on a compatible 64-bit processor or System on a Chip (SoC)
  • RAM: 4 gigabyte (GB)
  • Storage: 64 GB or larger storage device
  • System firmware: UEFI, Secure Boot capable
  • TPM: Trusted Platform Module (TPM) version 2.0
  • Graphics card: Compatible with DirectX 12 or later with WDDM 2.0 driver
  • Display: High definition (720p) display that is greater than 9-inches diagonally, 8 bits per color channel
  • Internet connection and Microsoft accounts: Windows 11 Home edition requires internet connectivity and a Microsoft account to complete device setup on first use. Switching a device out of Windows 11 Home in S mode also requires internet connectivity. For all Windows 11 editions, internet access is required to perform updates and to download and take advantage of some features. A Microsoft account is required for some features.

What do you think?

What were they thinking? TPM chip? Putting Win 10 out of support? At least there are ways to install without a TPM chip.

Originally posted by RPG Hacker
I actually kinda like simplistic logos. I guess that's a somewhat unpopular opinion, but there we go.

The only thing that's somewhat bothering me about the Windows 11 logo is that it has sharp corners, which is in no way reflective of the actual OS. I think they should have given the logo round corners, kinda like the Windows 1.0 logo. That's really a nitpick, though.

I think it's a metaphor on how they didn't cut corners or something
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Forum Index - Donut Plains - Computers & Technology - What do you think about Windows 11 leaks? (Windows 11 was finally revealed)

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